Reference > Cambridge History > The Drama to 1642, Part Two > Thomas Heywood > Bibliography

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Vol. 6. The Drama to 1642, Part Two.


IV. Thomas Heywood.

Bibliography.



I. DRAMATIC WORKS

A. Early Editions

The First and Second Parts of King Edward the Fourth. Containing His mery pastime with the Tanner of Tamworth, as also his love to faire mistrisse Shoare, her great promotion, fall and miserie, and lastly the lamentable death of both her and her husband. Likewise the besieging of London, by the Bastard Falconbridge, and the valiant defence of the same by the Lord Mayor and the Citizens. As it hath divers times beene publikely played by the Right Honorable the Earle of Derbie his servants. 1600.
If You Know Not Me, You Know No Bodie; Or, The troubles of Queene Elizabeth. 1605. Other eds. 1606, 1608, 1610, 1628, 1632, 1680.
The Second Part of, If you know not me, you know no bodie. With the building of the Royall Exchange: And the famous Victorie of Queene Elizabeth, in the year 1588. 1606.
Another edition, of 1609, bears the title, The Second Part of Queene Elizabeths troubles. Doctor Paries treasons: The building of the Royall Exchange, and the famous Victory in An. 1588. With the Humors of Hobson, and Tawnycote.
A Woman Kilde with Kindnesse. Written by Tho. Heywood. 1607. Rptd. in Reed’s Dodsley, vol. VII, in Ancient B. D., vol. II, and in Collier’s Dodsley, vol. VII.
The Rape of Lucrece. A True Roman Tragedie. With the severall Songes in their apt place, by Valerius, the Merrie Lord among the Roman Peres. Acted by her majesties Servants at the Red-Bull, neare Clarkenwell. Written by Thomas Heywood. 1608. Rptd. in Old English Drama, vol. I, 1824.
The Foure Prentises of London. With the Conquest of Jerusalem. As it hath bene diverse times Acted, at the Red Bull, by the Queenes Majesties Servants. Written by Thomas Heywood. 1632. Rptd. in Ancient B. D., vol. II, and in Collier’s Dodsley, vol. VI.
The Fair Maid Of The West. Or, A Girle worth gold. The first part. As it was lately acted before the King and Queen, with approved liking, By the Queens Majesties Comedians. Written by T. H. 1631. [The second part was published in the same year with the same title.]
The Golden Age. Or The lives of Jupiter and Saturne, with the defining of the Heathen Gods. As it hath beene sundry times acted at the Red Bull, by the Queenes Majesties Servants. Written by Thomas Heywood. Tam robur, tam robor. in-colis Arbor Jovis. 1610.
The Silver Age, Including. The love of Jupiter to Alcmena: The birth of Hercules. And the Rape of Proserpine. Concluding, With the Arraignement of the Moone. Written by Thomas Heywood. Aut prodesse solent aut delectare. 1613.
The Brazen Age, The first Act containing, The death of the Centaure Nessus, The Second, The Tragedy of Meleager: The Third, The Tragedy of Jason and Medea. The fourth. Vulcans Net. The fifth. The Labours and death of Hercules: Written by Thomas Heywood. 1613.
The Iron Age: Contayning the Rape of Hellen: The siege of Troy: The Combate betwixt Hector and Ajax: Hector and Troilus slayne by Achilles: Achilles slaine by Paris: Ajax and Ulisses contend for the Armour of Achilles: The Death of Ajax, &c. Written by Thomas Heywood. Aut prodesse solent, aut delectare. 1632.
The Second Part of the Iron Age. Which contayneth the death of Penthesilea, Paris, Priam and Hecuba: The burning of Troy: The deaths of Agamemnon, Menelaus, Clitemnestra, Hellena, Orestes, Egistus, Pilladse, King Diomed, Pyrhus, Cethus, Synon, Thersites, &c. Written by Thomas Heywood. 1632.
The English Traveller. As it hath beene Publikely acted at the Cock-Pit in Drury-lane: By Her Majesties servants. Written by Thomas Heywood. Aut prodesse solent, aut delectare—. 1633. Rptd. in Dilke’s O. E. P., vol. VI.
A Pleasant Comedy, called A Mayden-Head Well Lost. As it hath beene publickly Acted at the Cocke-pit in Drury-lane, with much Applause: By her Majesties Servants. Written by Thomas Heywood. Aut prodesse solent, aut delectare. 1634. Rptd. in Old English Drama, vol II. 1824.
A Challenge For Beautie. As It Hath Beene Sundry times Acted, By the Kings Majesties Servants: At the Blacke-friers, and at the Globe on the Banke-side. Aut prodesse solent, aut Delectare—. Written by Thomas Heywood. 1636. Rptd. in Dilke’s O. E. P., vol. VI.
The Royall King, and The Loyall Subject. As it hath beene Acted with great Applause by the Queenes Majesties Servants. Aut prodesse solent, aut delectare—. Written by Thomas Heywood. 1637. Rptd. in Dilke’s O. E. P., vol. VI.
The Wise-woman Of Hogsdon A Comedie. As it hath been sundry times Acted with great Applause. Written by Tho. Heywood. Aut prodesse solent, aut Delectare—. 1638.
Loves Maistresse: Or, The Queens Masque. As it was three times presented before their two Excellent Majesties, within the space of eight dayes, In the presence of sundry Forraigne Ambassadors. Publikely Acted by the Queens Comoedians, At the Phoenix in Drury-Lane. Written by Thomas Heywood. Aut prodesse solent, and delectare. 1636. Rptd. in Old English Drama, vol. II, 1824.
(With Richard Brome.) The late Lancashire Witches. A well received Comedy, lately Acted at the Globe on the Banke-side, by the Kings Majesties Actors. Written, by Thom. Heywood, and Richard Broome. Aut prodesse solent, aut delectare. 1634.
(With William Rowley.) Fortune By Land and Sea. A Tragi-Comedy. As it was Acted with great Applause by the Queens Servants. Written by Tho. Heywood and William Rowley. 1655.



B. Modern Editions

The Dramatic Works of Thomas Heywood, now first collected, with illustrative notes and memoir of the author. (Pearson’s Reprint.) 6 vols. 1874. (This includes the following Pageants: Londini Jus Honorarium (1631); Londini Sinus Salutis (1635); Londini Speculum: or Londons Mirrour (1637); Porta pietatis, or The Port or Harbour of Piety (1638); and Londini Status Pacatus (1639).)
Thomas Heywood. (Mermaid Series.) Ed. Verity, A. W. With introduction by Symonds, J. A. 1888. (Contains A Woman Killed with Kindness; The Fair Maid of the West; The English Traveller; The Wise Woman of Hogsdon; the Rape of Lucrece.)
A Woman Killed with Kindness. Ed. Collier, J. P. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1850. Ed. Ward, A. W. (Temple Dramatists Series.) 1897. Ed. Cox, F. J. 1907.
Captives, the; Or The Lost Recovered. Bullen’s Old English Plays, vol. IV.
Edward IV, The First and Second Parts of. Ed. Field, Barron. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1842.
Fair Maid of the West, the, the First and Second Parts of. Ed. Collier, J. P. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1850.
Fortune by Land and Sea. By Thomas Heywood and William Rowley. Ed. Field, Barron. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1854.
Golden Age, the, and The Silver Age. Ed. Collier, J. P. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1851.
If You know not Me, you know no Bodie, or, The Troubles of Queen Elizabeth. Ed. Collier, J. P. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1851. (Prologue and Epilogue in Pleasant Dialogues and Drammas.) Rptd. by Blew, W. J., with Dekker and Webster’s Sir Thomas Wyat, as Two Old Plays, 1876.
Royal King, the, and Loyal Subject. Ed. Collier, J. P. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1850.

C. Plays ascribed to Heywood

A pleasant conceited Comedie, Wherein is shewed how a man may chuse a good Wife from a bad As it hath been sundry times Acted by the Earle of Worcesters Servants. 1602.
Cf. Baskerville, C. R., Source and Analogues of How a Man May Choose a Good Wife from a Bad. Mod. Lang. Assoc. of America, vol. XXIV, New Series, vol. XVII, no. 4, pp. 711–730. 1909.
Dicke of Devonshire, the Play of. A Tragi-Comedy. Hector adest secumque Deos in praelia ducit. [n.d.] Rptd. in Bullen’s Old English Plays, vol. II. As to sources, cf. Ward, vol. II, p. 583, note 4.
Fayre Mayde of the Exchange, the, With the pleasant humours of the Cripple of Fenchurch. Very Delectable, and full of mirth. 1607. Ed. Field, Barron. Shakesp. Soc. Publ. 1846.
No-Body, and Some-Body. With the true Chronicle Historie of Elydene who was fortunately three severall times crowned King of England. The true Coppy thereof, as it hath beene acted by the Queenes Majesties Servants. London, Printed for John Trundle and are to be sold at his shop in Barbican at the signe of No-body. [n.d.] Ed., with appendix on the story of the play, by Simpson, R., Simpson, vol I. Cf. Niemand und Jemand, Tieck’s translation, with introduction by Bolte, J., Shakesp. Jahrb., vol. XXIX, 1894.

D. Masques, Pageants, etc.

A Marriage Triumph on the Nuptials of the Prince Palatine and the Princess Elizabeth, daughter of James I. Rptd. from the ed. of 1613. Percy Soc. Publ., vol. VIII. 1842.
Londons Jus Honorarium. Exprest in sundry Triumphs, pagiants, and shews: At the Initiation or Entrance of the Right Honourable George Whitmore, into the Mayoralty of the famous and farre renouned City of London. All the charge and expense of the laborious projects, and objects both by Water and Land, being the sole undertaking of the Right Worshipfull, the society of the Habburdashers. Redeunt spectacula. 1631.
Londini Sinus Salutis, Or Londons Harbour of Health, and Happinesse. Expressed in sundry Triumphs, Pageants and Showes; at the Initiation of the Right Honorable, Christopher Clethrowe, Into the Mayoralty of the farre Renowned City London. All the Charges and Expences of this present Ovation; being the sole undertaking of the Right Worshipfull company of the Ironmongers. The 29. of October, Anno Salutis. 1635. Written by Thomas Heywood.—Redeunt Spectacula—. 1635.
Londini Speculum: Or, Londons Mirror, Exprest in sundry Triumphs, Pageants, and Showes, at the Initiation of the right Honorable Richard Fenn, into the Mairolty of the Famous and farre renowned City London. All the Charge and Expence of these laborious projects both by Water and Land, being the sole undertaking of the Right Worshipful Company of the Habberdashers. Written by Tho. Heywood. 1637.
Porta pietatis, or, The Port of Harbour of Piety. Exprest in sundry Triumphes, Pageants, and Showes, at the Initiation of the Right Honourable Sir Maurice Abbot, Knight, into the Mayoralty of the famous and farre renowned City London. All the charge and expence of the laborious Projects, both by water and Land, being the sole undertaking of the Right Worshipful Company of the Drapers. Written by Thomas Heywood,—Redeunt Spectacula—. 1638.
Londini Status Pecatus: Or, Londons Peaceable Estate. Exprest in sundry Triumphs, Pageants, and Shewes, at the Innitiation of the right Honourable Henry Garway, into the Mayoralty of the Famous and farre Renowned City London. All the Charge and Expence, of the laborious Projects both by Water and Land, being the sole undertakings of the Right Worshipfull Society of Drapers. Written by Thomas Heywood. Redeunt Spectacula. 1639.

Of Londini Artium et Scientiarum Scaturigo, London’s Fountain of Arts and Sciences (1632) and Londini Emporia, or London’s Mercatura (1633), some account is given in Fairholt, F. W., Lord Mayor’s Pageants, Part I, Percy Soc. Publ., 1843. For Loves Maistresse, see Sec. I A above.


II OTHER WORKS

A. Verse

Troia Britannica, or Great Britain’s Troy. 1609.
The Life and Death of Hector. 1614. [A modernisation of Lydgate’s Troy Book.]
Albert, F. Über Thomas Heywood’s The Life and Death of Hector eine Neubearbeitung in Lydgate’s Troy Book. Münchener Beiträge vol. XLII. Leipzig, 1909.
The Hierarchie of the Blessed Angells. Their Names, orders and Offices. The fall of Lucifer with his Angells. 1635.
Pleasant Dialogues and Dramma’s selected out of Lucian, Erasmus, Textor, Ovid, &c., With sundry Emblems extracted from the most elegant Jacobus Catsius. As also certaine Elegies, Epitaphs and Epithalamions or Nuptiall Songs; Anagrams and Acrosticks, with divers Speeches (upon severall occasions) spoken to their most Excellent Majesties, King Charles and Queen Mary. With other Fancies translated from Beza, Bucanan, and sundry Italian Poets. By Tho. Heywood. Aut prodesse solent, aut delectare—.1637. [Contains: The Dialogue of Erasmus, called Naufragium; The Dialogue of Erasmus, called Procus and Puella; The Dialogue of Ravisius Textor, called Earth and Age; A Dialogue from Lucianus Samosatensis, called Misanthropos, or the Man-hater; A Dialogue of the same Author, betwixt Jupiter and Ganimedes; a third betwixt Jupiter and Juno; a fourth betwixt Jupiter and Cupid; a fifth betwixt Vulcan and Apollo; a sixth betwixt Apollo and Mercury; a seventh betwixt Maia and Mercury; an eighth betwixt Jupiter and Vulcan; a ninth betwixt Mercurie and Neptune; a tenth betwixt Mausolus and Diogenes; an eleventh betwixt Diogenes and Crates; a twelfth betwixt Charon, Menippus and Mercury; a thirteenth betwixt Menippus, Æacus, Pythagoras, Empedocles, and Socrates; a fourteenth betwixt Nireus, Thersites and Menippus; A Dialogue called Deorum Judicium, betwixt Jupiter, Mercurie, Juno, Pallas, Venus and Paris; A Drama from Ovid, called Jupiter, and 10; A second from Ovid called Apollo and Daphne; A Pastorall Drama called Ampharisa, or the Forsaken Shepheardesse; Forty sixe emblems interpreted from the most excellent Emblematist, Jacobus Catsius. The Argument, A discourse betwixt Anna and Phillis; Divers Speeches spoken before their two sacred Majesties, and before sundry other Noble persons upon severall occasions; A Maske presented at Hunsdon House; Prologues and Epilogues upon other occasions.]

Ed. with introduction and notes by Bang, W., Bang’s Materialien, vol. III, 1903.


B. Prose

Translation of Sallust. 1608.
An Apology for Actors. 1612. Rptd. by Scott, Sir Walter, Somers Tracts, vol. III, and ed. by Collier, J. P., from the edition of 1612, compared with that of Cartwright, W., 1658; with an introduction and notes, Shakesp. Soc. Publ., 1841. [Cf. bibliography to Chap. XIV, Sec. III, post.]
Tuvalkeîov or Nine Bookes of Various History, concerninge Women, inscribed by the names of the Nine Muses. 1624. Rptd. as The General History of Women, 1657.
England’s Elizabeth, her life and troubles during her minoritie from the cradle to the crown. 1632. Another ed. 1641.
Rptd. in Harleian Miscellany, vol. X, 1813.
Exemplary Lives and Memorable Acts of Nine of the Most Worthy Women of the World. Three Jewes. Three Gentiles. Three Christians. 1640.
The Life of Merlin, surnamed Ambrosius, His Prophecies and Predictions interpreted, and their truth made good by our English Annalls. 1641.

III. BIOGRAPHY AND CRITICISM

See, besides articles in Retrospective Review (1825) and Edinburgh Review (1891); Collier, J. P., introduction to his edition of An Apology for Actors; Fleay’s English Drama, vol. I, pp. 276–306; Symonds, J. A., introduction to the Mermaid Series selection of Heywood; Ward, vol. II, pp. 550-589, and the same writer’s notices in Dictionary of National Biography, vol. XXVI (1891), and in the introduction to his edition of A Woman Killed with Kindness (1897). For the titles of the chief English “murder plays” and other productions of domestic drama, and for those of modern publications on the subject, see text, pp. 94–7 and notes. The sources of A Woman Kilde with Kindnesse are given in Creizenach, p. 145.




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