Reference > Cambridge History > From the Beginnings to the Cycles of Romance > English Scholars of Paris and Franciscans of Oxford > Jean de Hauteville; Alain de Lille
  Nigel Wireker Geoffrey de Vinsauf; Alexander Neckam  

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

The Cambridge History of English and American Literature in 18 Volumes (1907–21).
Volume I. From the Beginnings to the Cycles of Romance.

X. English Scholars of Paris and Franciscans of Oxford.

§ 8. Jean de Hauteville; Alain de Lille.


The Architrenius or “Arch-Mourner” of the Norman satirist Jean de Hauteville ((fl. 1184), who was born near Rouen and passed part of his life in England, has only a slight connection with our present subject. The pilgrim of that satire pays a visit to Paris, and describes the hardships of the students and the fruitlessness of their studies; he afterwards arrives at the hill of Presumption, which is the haunt of all manner of monks and ecclesiastics, as well as the great scholastic doctors and professors. The seven liberal arts are elaborately described in the Anti-Claudianus of the Universal Doctor, Alain de Lille (1114-1203). This fine poem, and the mingled prose and verse of the De Planctu Naturae, were familiar to Chaucer. Alain probably passed some time in England with the Cistercians at Waverley in Surrey (1128), and he is the reputed author of a commentary on the prophecies of Merlin.   22

CONTENTS · VOLUME CONTENTS · INDEX OF ALL CHAPTERS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  Nigel Wireker Geoffrey de Vinsauf; Alexander Neckam  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors