Nonfiction > Henry Craik, ed. > English Prose > Vol. III. Seventeenth Century
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CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD

Henry Craik, ed.  English Prose.  1916.
 
Vol. III. Seventeenth Century
 
Introduction by Henry Craik
Bishop John Pearson.
 1612–1686.  
Critical Introduction by J. H. Overton
The True Notion of Saints
John Evelyn.
 1620–1706.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
Foreign Travel
Public Employment
The Work of the Royal Society
The Groans of the Forest
The Great Fire
Ill Government of the Navy
Mr. Samuel Pepys
A Funeral Sermon
Andrew Marvell.
 1621–1678.  
Critical Introduction by W. P. Ker
Jocular Divinity
Algernon Sidney.
 1623–1683.  
Critical Introduction by F. H. Trench
The Degradation of Italy
The Wisdom of Flexible Constitutions
The Virtues of Liberty
Folly of Hereditary Kingship
The Right to Change Rulers
The Basis of Social Order
The Invisible King
George Fox.
 1624–1691.  
Critical Introduction by A. I. Fitzroy
A Sense of the Blood of Martyrs
A Youthful Martyr
A Man of a Tender Conscience
An Appeal
Greeting to Charles II. on his Restoration
Robert Boyle.
 1627–1691.  
Critical Introduction by G. S. Street
The Value of Natural Philosophy
The Holy Scriptures
An Experiment
The Writing of a Romance
John Bunyan.
 1628–1688.  
Critical Introduction by H. C. Beeching
The Story of Bunyan’s Conversion
Christian Loses his Roll
The Trial of Christian and Faithful
Mr. By-ends
Christiana’s Neighbours
Letters to and from Diabolus
Sir William Temple.
 1628–1699.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Temple on his Way to Munster
The Garden of Moor Park in Hertfordshire
Peroration on Poetry
The Limits of Human Faculties
John Ray.
 1627–1705.  
Critical Introduction by Norman Moore
An Argument of Providence
Hurling
Isaac Barrow.
 1630–1677.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
As we would be done by
The Kingdom of Heaven
The Silence of History and Tradition on the Pope’s Supremacy
John Tillotson.
 1630–1694.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
Scattered Thoughts upon several Subjects and Occasions
Of Society and Vanity
John Dryden.
 1631–1700.  
Critical Introduction by W. J. Courthope
A Defence of Rhyme in Tragedy
Abandonment of Rhyme in Tragedy: Imitation of Shakespeare
Shakespeare. Beaumont and Fletcher. Ben Jonson
The Old Dramatists and the New
The Wits of King Charles II.’s Days
An Apology for The Duke of Guise
Dryden and his Critics
Dryden and Collier
Chaucer
Religio Laici
His Old Age
Anthony Wood.
 1632–1695.  
Critical Introduction by F. H. Trench
Ancient Oxford
The King’s Coming to Oxon
The Author of Oceana
John Locke.
 1632–1704.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
Perception
The Greater Good does not Determine the Will
Adam’s Monarchy
Force without Right, a State of War
The Proper Qualities for a Tutor
School Verses
Prose Style
To Mr. Molyneux, 1693
To Mr. Molyneux, 1694
Bishop Richard Cumberland.
 1631–1718.  
Critical Introduction by A. I. Fitzroy
Providence in the Conquest of Canaan
The Primitive Arcadians called Pelasgi
The Egyptian Standard in the Time of Joseph
George Savile,
Marquis of Halifax.
 1633–1695.  
Critical Introduction by A. W. Ward
Liberty, and the English Constitution
Truth and Trimmers
Concluding Considerations on the Character of Charles II.
On the Treatment of Children
Samuel Pepys.
 1633–1703.  
Critical Introduction by W. P. Ker
Sir C. Mings
The Fire
Epsom Downs
Robert South.
 1634–1716.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
The Happiness of Adam
Of the Light within us
The Loss of Shame
The ultima ratio of Belief
Thomas Burnet.
 1635?–1715.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund Gosse
The Deluge
Paradise
The Conflagration
Edward Stillingfleet.
 1635–1699.  
Critical Introduction by J. H. Overton
The Judgment of Fire
Fools make a Mock at Sin
Knowledge and Names
Sir George Mackenzie.
 1636–1691.  
Critical Introduction by W. A. Raleigh
A Defence of Romances
Why Man Fell
Thomas Sprat.
 1635–1713.  
Critical Introduction by W. A. Raleigh
A Simple and an Ornate Style
The Error of Extempore Prayer and Preaching
The Defence of English Eloquence and Letters
Thomas Ken.
 1637–1711.  
Critical Introduction by J. H. Overton
Daniel, a Man Greatly Beloved
God’s Blessing on the Baths
Thomas Ellwood.
 1639–1713.  
Critical Introduction by W. P. Ker
An Adventure
Thomas Rymer.
 1641–1713.  
Critical Introduction by W. P. Ker
A Tragedy called the “Invincible Armado
William and Thomas Sherlock  Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
William Sherlock.
 1641?–1707.  
Preparation for Death a Cure for Fear of Death
Conscience Powerful and Impotent
Thomas Sherlock.
 1678–1761.  
The Responsibility of Parents
The Resurrection and Evidence
Sir Isaac Newton.
 1642–1727.  
Critical Introduction by Edmund K. Chambers
On the Belief in a God
Gilbert Burnet.
 1643–1715.  
Critical Introduction by F. C. Montague
The National Blessing of Religion
The Character of William III.
The Character of Sir Matthew Hale
William Penn.
 1644–1718.  
Critical Introduction by A. I. Fitzroy
An Exhortation
A Plea for Toleration
Edward Browne.
 1644–1708.  
Critical Introduction by Norman Moore
Unicorns’ Horns
The Emperor Leopoldus
Andrew Fletcher
of Saltoun.
 1655–1716.  
Critical Introduction by W. Wallace
Love of Country
Enslavement of Vagabonds
The Origin of Beggary
Daniel Defoe.
 1661?–1731.  
Critical Introduction by John W. Hales
An Academy for Women
Selfish Preachers of Toleration
A Footprint
Richard Bentley.
 1662–1742.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
An Apology for Resentment
The Commonplaces of Scepticism
Captious Arguments answered
Flattery of Epicurus
Jonathan Swift.
 1667–1745.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
Dedication: to the Right Honourable John Lord Somers
The Epistle Dedicatory, to His Royal Highness Prince Posterity
The Philosophy of Clothes
A Digression concerning Critics
Sweetness and Light
Political Lying
Arguments of Weight
Ireland an Independent Kingdom
Irish Misery
The Emperor of Lilliput
The King of Brobdingnag inquires into the State of Europe
True and False Raillery
John Arbuthnot.
 1667–1735.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
Newton’s Discovery
Mother Church
Sister Peg
Physical Philosophy
A Farewell Letter
Bernard Mandeville.
 1670–1733.  
Critical Introduction by George Saintsbury
The Genesis of Vanity
Diamond cut Diamond
Gin
A Parable of Small Beer
Lord Shaftesbury.
 1671–1713.  
Critical Introduction by E. K. Chambers
On Enthusiasm
The Pleasure of the Natural Affections
Francis Atterbury.
 1662–1732.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
Waller’s Influence on Style
To the House of Lords
The Uses of Harmony
To his Daughter
Richard Steele.
 1672–1729.  
Critical Introduction by Austin Dobson
Mr. Bickerstaff Visits a Friend
Recollections of Childhood
The Story of Brunetta and Phillis
The Coverley Portrait Gallery
The Story of Alexander Selkirk
Joseph Addison.
 1672–1719.  
Critical Introduction by W. J. Courthope
The Spectator and its Purpose
To see Ourselves as Others see Us
The Spectator’s anticipation of the Verdict of Posterity
The Royal Exchange
Head-dresses
Hoods
Will. Wimble
Sir Roger de Coverley at the Play
The News at the Club of Sir Roger de Coverley’s Death
The Visions of Mirzah
The Various Kinds of Wit
Imagination and Science
Samuel Clarke.
 1675–1729.  
Critical Introduction by A. I. Fitzroy
Arguments to the Being of God
On Human Fallibility
On the Necessity of Morality in Religion
On Hypocrites
Paraphrase of Matthew XXVI.
Benjamin Hoadly.
 1676–1761.  
Critical Introduction by A. I. Fitzroy
The Simplicity of Christianity spoilt by Additions
On the Ecclesiasticism of the Church of England
Upon Political Jealousies
Henry St. John,
Viscount Bolingbroke.
 1678–1751.  
Critical Introduction by Henry Craik
The Uses of History
Eloquence
Discarded Service
A Religion of Hypocrisy
Alexander Pope.
 1688–1744.  
Critical Introduction by W. J. Courthope
Letter to Lady Mary Wortley Montagu
Letter to Mrs. Martha Blount
Letter to the Bishop of Rochester
Letter to Swift
Letter to the Earl of Burlington
Shakespeare
Dedications
Lady Mary
Wortley Montagu.
 1689–1762.  
Critical Introduction by A. W. Ward
Ideals
The Fair Fatima
The Arnaöut Religion
Self-restraint
Among the Italian Lakes
As Proud as the Marchioness Lyscinnia
John, Lord Hervey.
 1696–1743.  
Critical Introduction by G. S. Street
The Character of Bolingbroke
The Death of Queen Caroline

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