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Epictetus. (c.A.D. 50–c.A.D. 138).  The Golden Sayings of Epictetus.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
LXXXV
 
 
Seemeth it nothing to you, never to accuse, never to blame either God or Man? To wear ever the same countenance in going forth as in coming in? This was the secret of Socrates: yet he never said that he knew or taught anything…. Who amongst you makes this his aim? Were it indeed so, you would gladly endure sickness, hunger, aye, death itself.  1
 

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