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Epictetus. (c.A.D. 50–c.A.D. 138).  The Golden Sayings of Epictetus.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
XLIII
 
 
A man was talking to me to-day about the priesthood of Augustus. I said to him, “Let the thing go, my good Sir; you will spend a great deal to no purpose.”  1
  “Well, but my name will be inserted in all documents and contracts.”  2
  “Will you be standing there to tell those that read them, That is my name written there? And even though you could now be there in every case, what will you do when you are dead?”  3
  “At all events my name will remain.”  4
  “Inscribe it on a stone and it will remain just as well. And think, beyond Nicopolis what memory of you will there be?”  5
  “But I shall have a golden wreath to wear.”  6
  “If you must have a wreath, get a wreath of roses and put it on; you will look more elegant!”  7
 

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