Thomas Bulfinch > The Age of Fable > Vols. I & II: Stories of Gods and Heroes > XXIV. c. Amphion
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Thomas Bulfinch (1796–1867).  Age of Fable: Vols. I & II: Stories of Gods and Heroes.  1913.

XXIV. c.  Amphion
 
THE FOLLOWING are other celebrated mythical poets and musicians, some of whom were hardly inferior to Orpheus himself:   1
  
AMPHION

AMPHION was the son of Jupiter and Antiope, queen of Thebes. With his twin brother Zethus he was exposed at birth on Mount Cithæron, where they grew up among the shepherds, not knowing their parentage. Mercury gave Amphion a lyre and taught him to play upon it, and his brother occupied himself in hunting and tending the flocks. Meanwhile Antiope, their mother, who had been treated with great cruelty by Lycus, the usurping king of Thebes, and by Dirce, his wife, found means to inform her children of their rights and to summon them to her assistance. With a band of their fellow-herdsmen they attacked and slew Lycus, and tying Dirce by the hair of her head to a bull, let him drag her till she was dead. Amphion, having become king of Thebes, fortified the city with a wall. It is said that when he played on his lyre the stones moved of their own accord and took their places in the wall.
   2
  See Tennyson’s poem of “Amphion” for an amusing use made of this story.   3

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