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Henry M. Robert (1837–1923).  Robert’s Rules of Order Revised.  1915.


Page 66

recess, or whether it simply adjourned having previously adopted a program or rule providing for the hours of meeting. When an assembly has frequent short regular meetings not lasting over a day, and an adjourned meeting is held on another day, the interval between the meetings is not referred to as a recess.

19. Questions of Privilege.

   Questions relating to the rights and privileges of the assembly, or to any of its members, take precedence of all other motions except the three preceding relating to adjournment and recess, to which they yield. If the question is one requiring immediate action it may interrupt a member’s speech; as, for example, when, from any cause, a report that is being read cannot be heard in a part of the hall. But if it is not of such urgency it should not interrupt a member after he has commenced his speech. Before a member has commenced speaking, even though he has been assigned the floor, it is in order for another member to raise a question of privilege. When a member rises for this purpose he should not wait to be recognized, but immediately on rising should say, “Mr. Chairman,” — and when he catches the chairman’s eye, should add, “I rise to a question of privilege affecting the assembly,” or “I rise to a question of personal privilege.” The chair directs him to state his question, and then decides whether



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