Robert’s Rules of Order Revised > Subject Index > Page 191
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Henry M. Robert (1837–1923).  Robert’s Rules of Order Revised.  1915.


Page 191

or if there was a count, the vote would be announced thus: “There are 95 votes in the affirmative, and 99 in the negative, so the amendment is lost, and the question is now on the resolution; are you ready for the question?” In announcing a vote the chair should state first whether the motion is carried or lost; second, what is the effect, or result, of the vote; and third, what is the immediately pending question or business, if there is any. If there is none, he should ask, “What is the further pleasure of the assembly?” One of the most prolific causes of confusion in deliberative assemblies is the neglect of the chair to keep the assembly well informed as to what is the pending business. The habit of announcing the vote by simply saying that the “motion is carried” and then sitting down, cannot be too strongly condemned. Many members may not know what is the effect of the vote, and it is the chair’s duty to inform the assembly what is the result of the motion’s being carried or lost, and what business comes next before the assembly.
  When a quorum [64] is present, a majority vote, that is a majority of the votes cast, ignoring blanks, is sufficient for the adoption of any motion that is in order, except those mentioned in 48, which require a two-thirds vote. A plurality never adopts a motion nor elects any one to office, unless by virtue of a special rule previously adopted. On a tie vote the



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