Robert’s Rules of Order Revised > 13. Legal Rights of Assemblies and Trial of Their Members. > 72. The Right of a Deliberative Assembly to Punish its Members.
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Henry M. Robert (1837–1923).  Robert’s Rules of Order Revised.  1915.

Art. XIII.   Legal Rights of Assemblies and Trial of Their Members.

Right of an Assembly to Punish its Members 72.
Right of an Assembly to Eject any one from its Place of Meeting     73.
Rights of Ecclesiastical Tribunals 74.
Trial of Members of Societies 75.

72. The Right of a Deliberative Assembly to Punish its Members.


A deliberative assembly has the inherent right to make and enforce its own laws and punish an offender, the extreme penalty, however, being expulsion from its own body. When expelled, if the assembly is a permanent society, it has the right, for its own protection, to give public notice that the person has ceased to be a member of that society.   1
  But it has no right to go beyond what is necessary for self-protection and publish the charges against the member. In a case where a member of a society was expelled, and an officer of the society published, by its order, a statement of the grave charges upon which he had been found guilty, the expelled member recovered damages from the officer in a suit for libel, the court holding that the truth of the charges did not affect the case.   2



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