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Æsop. (Sixth century B.C.)  Fables.
The Harvard Classics.  1909–14.
 
The Tree and the Reed
 
 
“WELL, little one,” said a Tree to a Reed that was growing at its foot, “why do you not plant your feet deeply in the ground, and raise your head boldly in the air as I do?”  1
  “I am contented with my lot,” said the Reed. “I may not be so grand, but I think I am safer.”  2
  “Safe!” sneered the Tree. “Who shall pluck me up by the roots or bow my head to the ground?” But it soon had to repent of its boasting, for a hurricane arose which tore it up from its roots, and cast it a useless log on the ground, while the little Reed, bending to the force of the wind, soon stood upright again when the storm had passed over.
        “OBSCURITY OFTEN BRINGS SAFETY.”
  3
 

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