Reference > Quotations > Frank J. Wilstach, comp. > A Dictionary of Similes
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Frank J. Wilstach, comp.  A Dictionary of Similes.  1916.
 
Virtue
 
  Virtue, like the sun, retains its resplendence, though frequently obscured by clouds.
            —Anonymous
  1
  Virtue is like a rich stone, best plain set; and surely virtue is best in a body that is comely, though not of delicate features, and that hath rather dignity of presence than beauty of aspect.
            —Francis Bacon
  2
  Virtue is like precious odors, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed; for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.
            —Francis Bacon
  3
  Virtue is like health, the harmony of the whole man.
            —Thomas Carlyle
  4
  Like other plants, virtue will not grow unless its roots be hidden, buried from the eye of the sun.
            —Thomas Carlyle
  5
  Virtue and learning, like gold, have their intrinsic value; but if they are not polished, they certainly lose a great deal of their lustre; and even polished brass will pass upon more people than rough gold.
            —Earl of Chesterfield
  6
  The pleasure of a fine woman is like that of her own virtue—not so much in the thing, as the reputation of having it.
            —Colley Cibber
  7
  Virtue is like the polar star, which keeps its place, and all stars turn towards it.
            —Confucius
  8
My virtue, like a string, wound up by art
To the same sound, when yours was touched, took part,
At distance shook, and trembled at my heart.
            —John Dryden
  9
  The virtues, like the muses, are always seen in groups. A good principle was never found solitary in any breast.
            —Jane Porter
  10
  The virtues are lost in interest, as rivers are lost in the sea.
            —François de La Rochefoucauld
  11
  Virtue, like the clear heavens, is without clouds.
            —Sir Philip Sidney
  12
  Virtues and discourses are like friends, necessary in all fortunes; but those are the best which are friends in our sadnesses, and support us in our sorrows and sad accidents: and in this sense, no man that is virtuous can be friendless.
            —Jeremy Taylor
  13
 
 
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