Reference > Quotations > Frank J. Wilstach, comp. > A Dictionary of Similes
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Frank J. Wilstach, comp.  A Dictionary of Similes.  1916.
 
Pale
 
  Pale as an Angel of the Grave.
            —Anonymous
  1
  Pale as Banquo’s ghost.
            —Anonymous
  2
  Pale as linen.
            —Anonymous
  3
  Pale as parchment.
            —Anonymous
  4
  Pale as the gleam of a glow-worm.
            —Anonymous
  5
  Pale as the haggard features of despair.
            —Anonymous
  6
  Pale as the rose-leaves withered in the northern gale.
            —Anonymous
  7
  Pale as turnips were his cheeks.
            —Anonymous
  8
  Pale as with the sickness that promised death.
            —Anonymous
  9
  Grew pale, like a flower that is cut off.
            —Assyrian
  10
  Pale as a moon that moves alone through lonely space.
            —Alfred Austin
  11
  Pale as snowdrift in the frost.
            —Charles D. Bell
  12
  Pale as the moon before the solar ray.
            —Samuel Boyse
  13
  Pale as a white stone.
            —Charlotte Brontë
  14
  Pale as baby carved in stone.
            —Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  15
  Pale … as one who saw an ecstasy beyond a foretold agony.
            —Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  16
Pale as crocus grows
Close beside a rose-tree’s root.
            —Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  17
  Pale as the silver cross of Savoy.
            —Elizabeth Barrett Browning
  18
  Pale as a spectre.
            —Edward Bulwer-Lytton
  19
  Pale like only lily.
            —Robert Burns
  20
  Pale as ashes, or a clout.
            —Samuel Butler
  21
  Pale as death.
            —Samuel Butler
  22
  Pale … as any lead.
            —Geoffrey Chaucer
  23
  Like a dede ymage, pale and wan.
            —Geoffrey Chaucer
  24
  Palle as asshen colde.
            —Geoffrey Chaucer
  25
  Pale as a witch.
            —Richard Cumberland
  26
  Pale as driven by a beating storm at sea.
            —Richard Henry Dana (1815–1882)
  27
  Pale as a new cheese.
            —Thomas Dekker
  28
  Pale as a wreath of Alpine snow.
            —Lord De Tabley
  29
  Pale as a candle.
            —Charles Dickens
  30
  Pale as a muffin.
            —Charles Dickens
  31
  Pale as fires when mastered by the night.
            —John Dryden
  32
  Pale as a ghost.
            —Alexandre Dumas, père
  33
  Pale as a sheet.
            —Alexandre Dumas, père
  34
                Pale
Like a white, bright boat in the sky’s vast seas.
            —Margaret Ewing
  35
  Pale and thin as an autumn moon.
            —Frederick William Faber
  36
            Pearly pale,
Like a white transparent veil.
            —Frederick William Faber
  37
  Pale and meagre as a court page.
            —Henry Fielding
  38
  Pale as a moonbeam.
            —Gustave Flaubert
  39
  Pale as brow of one on whom the axe is falling.
            —Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
  40
  Pale as a petulant star.
            —Helen Hay
  41
  Pale as the tender tints that blush upon a baby’s cheek.
            —John R. Hayes
  42
  Pale as wordless grief.
            —F. Wyville Home
  43
  Pale as frosty snow-drops.
            —Thomas Hood
  44
  Pale, like cheeks that feel the chill of affright.
            —Thomas Hood
  45
  Pale as the Champa flowers.
            —Laurence Hope
  46
  Pale as a lover dying of despair.
            —Arsène Houssaye
  47
  Pale as a trappist.
            —Arsène Houssaye
  48
  Pale as a corpse.
            —Victor Hugo
  49
                Pale she was
As lily yet unsmiled on by the sun.
            —Jean Ingelow
  50
  Pale as the moonlight beam.
            —Mrs. Richmond Inglis
  51
  Pale as smooth-sculptured stone.
            —John Keats
  52
  Pale as Orithyia when she was borne away.
            —Walter Savage Landor
  53
  More pale than the meadows of Anjou.
            —Andrew Lang
  54
  Pale as an unawakened Galatea.
            —Amy Leslie
  55
  Pale as pale November dawn.
            —Amy Leslie
  56
        Pale as is the face of one
Who sinks exhausted in oblivion after a night of deep debauchery.
            —George Cabot Lodge
  57
  Pale as light.
            —George Cabot Lodge
  58
  Pale as are the dead.
            —Thomas Babington Macaulay
  59
  Pale as ascending ghost cast back to day.
            —David Mallet
  60
  Pale as a lily crowned with moonlight.
            —Gerald Massey
  61
  Pale as a pearl.
            —Gerald Massey
  62
  Pale as the sister of death.
            —George Meredith
  63
  Pale as a snowdrop in Cashmere.
            —Owen Meredith
  64
  Pale … as the icy moon.
            —Lewis Morris
  65
  Pale as marble.
            —Robert Morris
  66
  Pale as the angel of consumption.
            —Henri Murger
  67
  Pale as despairing woe.
            —Asian
  68
  Pale as the ended night.
            —John Payne
  69
  Pale as Paris plaster.
            —James Robinson Planché
  70
  Pale like those to whom dead Lazarus burst the tomb.
            —Charles Reade
  71
  Pale as a rain-washed rose.
            —Agnes Repplier
  72
  Pale as blossoms.
            —James Whitcomb Riley
  73
            Pale
As the fair changing moon.
            —Christina Georgina Rossetti
  74
  Pale as whom the Fates astound.
            —Christina Georgina Rossetti
  75
  Pale as Parian statues.
            —Christina Georgina Rossetti
  76
  Pale as transparent Psyche-wings.
            —Dante Gabriel Rossetti
  77
  Pale as bread.
            —Sadi
  78
  Pale as a whitewashed wall.
            —Friedrich von Schiller
  79
  Pale and wan, as watchlight by the bed of some departing man.
            —Sir Walter Scott
  80
  Pale as clay.
            —Sir Walter Scott
  81
  Pale as a clout in the versal world.
            —William Shakespeare
  82
  Pale, as if a bear was at his heels.
            —William Shakespeare
  83
  Pale as milk.
            —William Shakespeare
  84
  Pale lustre like the silver moon.
            —William Shakespeare
  85
  Pale as his shirt.
            —William Shakespeare
  86
  Pale as the breath of blue smoke in far woodlands.
            —William Sharp
  87
  Pale as yonder waning moon.
            —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  88
        Pale—like the white shore
Of Albion.
            —Percy Bysshe Shelley
  89
  Pale and pure as a maiden secluded in secret and cherished in fear.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  90
  Pale and sweet as a dream’s delight.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  91
  Pale as grass or later flowers.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  92
  Pale as the duskiest lily’s leaf.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  93
  Pale as the front of oblivion.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  94
  Pale as the glimmer of stars on moorland meres.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  95
  Pale as the moon in star-forsaken skies.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  96
  Pale … as twilight.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  97
  Paler than young snow.
            —Algernon Charles Swinburne
  98
  Skies as pale, as moonlight in a shadowy sea.
            —Arthur Symons
  99
  Pale as a tear.
            —John B. Tabb
  100
  Pale as a tablecloth.
            —William Makepeace Thackeray
  101
  Pale as Jephtha’s daughter.
            —Alfred Tennyson
  102
  Pale as the passing of a ghost.
            —Alfred Tennyson
  103
  Pale sad faces like faint flames dying.
            —George Sylvester Viereck
  104
 
 
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