Verse > William Wordsworth > Complete Poetical Works
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THE CUCKOO-CLOCK

          WOULDST thou be taught, when sleep has taken flight,
          By a sure voice that can most sweetly tell,
          How far off yet a glimpse of morning light,
          And if to lure the truant back be well,
          Forbear to covet a Repeater's stroke,
          That, answering to thy touch, will sound the hour;
          Better provide thee with a Cuckoo-clock
          For service hung behind thy chamber-door;
          And in due time the soft spontaneous shock,
          The double note, as if with living power,                   10
          Will to composure lead--or make thee blithe as bird in bower.

          List, Cuckoo--Cuckoo!--oft tho' tempests howl,
          Or nipping frost remind thee trees are bare,
          How cattle pine, and droop the shivering fowl,
          Thy spirits will seem to feed on balmy air:
          I speak with knowledge,--by that Voice beguiled,
          Thou wilt salute old memories as they throng
          Into thy heart; and fancies, running wild
          Through fresh green fields, and budding groves among,
          Will make thee happy, happy as a child:                     20
          Of sunshine wilt thou think, and flowers, and song,
          And breathe as in a world where nothing can go wrong.

          And know--that, even for him who shuns the day
          And nightly tosses on a bed of pain;
          Whose joys, from all but memory swept away,
          Must come unhoped for, if they come again;
          Know--that, for him whose waking thoughts, severe
          As his distress is sharp, would scorn my theme,
          The mimic notes, striking upon his ear
          In sleep, and intermingling with his dream,                 30
          Could from sad regions send him to a dear
          Delightful land of verdure, shower and gleam,
          To mock the 'wandering' Voice beside some haunted stream.

          O bounty without measure! while the grace
          Of Heaven doth in such wise, from humblest springs,
          Pour pleasure forth, and solaces that trace
          A mazy course along familiar things,
          Well may our hearts have faith that blessings come,
          Streaming from founts above the starry sky,
          With angels when their own untroubled home                  40
          They leave, and speed on nightly embassy
          To visit earthly chambers,--and for whom?
          Yea, both for souls who God's forbearance try,
          And those that seek his help, and for his mercy sigh.
                                                              1845.


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