Reference > Roget’s > International Thesaurus > 837. Dejection.
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Mawson, C.O.S., ed. (1870–1938). Roget’s International Thesaurus. 1922.
 
Class VI. Words Relating to the Sentient and Moral Powers
Section II. Personal Affections
1. Passive Affections
 
837. Dejection.
 
  
NOUN:DEJECTION; dejectedness &c. adj.; depression, prosternation [obs.], mopishness, damp; lowness -, depression- of spirits; weight -, oppression -, damp- on the spirits; low -, bad -, drooping -, depressed- spirits; heart sinking; heaviness -, failure- of heart.
  heaviness &c. adj.; infestivity, gloom; weariness [See Weariness]; tædium vitæ [L.], disgust of life; mal du pays [F.] (regret) [See Regret]; anhedonia.
  MELANCHOLY; sadness &c. adj.; Il Penseroso [Old It.], melancholia, dismals, blue devils [colloq.], blues [colloq.], mopes, lachrymals or lacrimals, mumps, dumps [chiefly humorous] doldrums, vapors [archaic], megrims, spleen [obsoles.], horrors, hypochondriasis, hypochondria, hyps [colloq.], jawfall [rare], pessimism; la maladie sans maladie [F.], despondency, slough of Despond; disconsolateness &c. adj.; hope deferred, blank despondency; voiceless woe.
  PROSTRATION, prostration of soul; broken heart; despair [See Hopelessness]; cave of despair, cave of Trophonius.
  GRAVITY; demureness &c. adj.; solemnity; long face, grave face.
  HYPOCHONDRIAC, seek-sorrow, selftormentor, heautontimorumenos [Gr.], malade imaginaire [F.], médecin tant pis [F.]; croaker, pessimist; mope, mopus [dial. Eng. & slang], damper, wet blanket crape-hanger [slang], Job’s comforter.
  [CAUSE OF DEJECTION] affliction [See Painfulness]; sorry sight; memento mori [L.]; deathwatch, death’s-head, skeleton at the feast.
  
VERB:BE DEJECTED &c. adj.; grieve; mourn (lament) [See Lamentation]; take on [colloq.], give way, lose heart, despond, droop, sink.
  LOWER, look downcast, frown, pout; hang down the head; pull -, make- a long face; laugh on the wrong side of the mouth; grin a ghastly smile; look blue, look like a drowned man; lay to heart, take to heart.
  MOPE, brood over; fret; sulk; pine, pine away; yearn; repine (regret) [See Regret]; despair [See Hopelessness].
  refrain from laughter, keep one’s countenance; be or look grave &c. adj.; repress a smile, keep a straight face.
  DEPRESS, discourage, dishearten, dispirit; damp, hyp [colloq.] dull, deject, lower, sink, dash, knock down, unman, prostrate, break one’s heart; frown upon; cast a gloom on, cast a shade on; sadden; damp -, dash -, wither- one’s hopes; weigh -, lie heavy -, prey- on the -mind, - spirits; damp -, dampen -, depress- the spirits.
  
ADJECTIVE:CHEERLESS, joyless, spiritless, uncheerful, uncheery, unlively; unhappy [See Pain]; melancholy, dismal, somber, dark, gloomy, triste [F.], clouded, murky, lowering, frowning, lugubrious, funereal, mournful, lamentable, dreadful.
  DREARY, flat; dull, - as -a beetle, - ditchwater; depressing &c. v.; damp [archaic].
  DOWNCAST, downhearted, mopy [colloq.], “melancholy as a gib cat” [I Henry IV]; a prey to melancholy; “besieged with sable-coloured melancholy” [L. L. L.]; down in the mouth [colloq.], down on one’s luck [colloq.]; heavy-hearted; in the -dumps, - suds [colloq.], - sulks, - doldrums; in doleful dumps, in bad humor; sullen; mumpish, dumpish, mopish, moping; moody, glum; sulky (discontented) [See Discontent]; out of -sorts, - humor, - heart, - spirits; ill at ease, low-spirited, in low spirits, a cup too low; weary [See Weariness]; discouraged, disheartened, desponding, chapfallen or chopfallen, jawfallen [rare], hypped [colloq.], hyppish [rare]; crestfallen.
  SAD, pensive, pensieroso [It.], tristful; dolesome, doleful; woe-begone, lachrymose, in tears, melancholic, hypochondriacal, bilious, jaundiced, atrabilious, saturnine, splenetic; lackadaisical.
  SERIOUS, sedate, staid, earnest; grave, - as -a judge, - an undertaker, - a mustard pot [colloq.]; sober, solemn, demure; grim, grim-faced, grim-visaged; rueful, wan, long-faced.
  DISCONSOLATE, inconsolable, forlorn, comfortless, desolate, désolé [F.], sick at heart; soul-sick, heartsick; au désespoir [F.]; in despair [See Hopelessness]; lost.
  OVERCOME; broken-down, borne-down, bowed-down; heartstricken &c. (mental suffering) [See Pain]; cut up [colloq.], dashed, sunk; unnerved, unmanned; downfallen, downtrodden; broken-hearted; careworn.
  
ADVERB:SADLY &c. adj.; with a long face, with tears in one’s eyes.
  
QUOTATIONS:
  1. The countenance falling.
  2. The heart failing one, the heart sinking within one.
  3. A plague of sighing and grief.—Henry IV
  4. Thick-ey’d musing and curs’d melancholy.—Henry IV
  5. Melancholy is the pleasure of being sad.—Victor Hugo
  6. The sickening pang of hope deferred.—Scott
  7. Our sincerest laughter With some pain is fraught.—Shelley

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