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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  The superior gastric plexus (plexus gastricus superior; gastric or coronary plexus) accompanies the left gastric artery along the lesser curvature of the stomach, and joins with branches from the left vagus.
  The suprarenal plexus (plexus suprarenalis) is formed by branches from the celiac plexus, from the celiac ganglion, and from the phrenic and greater splanchnic nerves, a ganglion being formed at the point of junction with the latter nerve. The plexus supplies the suprarenal gland, being distributed chiefly to its medullary portion; its branches are remarkable for their large size in comparison with that of the organ they supply.
  The renal plexus (plexus renalis) is formed by filaments from the celiac plexus, the aorticorenal ganglion, and the aortic plexus. It is joined also by the smallest splanchnic nerve. The nerves from these sources, fifteen or twenty in number, have a few ganglia developed upon them. They accompany the branches of the renal artery into the kidney; some filaments are distributed to the spermatic plexus and, on the right side, to the inferior vena cava.
  The spermatic plexus (plexus spermaticus) is derived from the renal plexus, receiving branches from the aortic plexus. It accompanies the internal spermatic artery to the testis. In the female, the ovarian plexus (plexus arteriæ ovaricæ) arises from the renal plexus, and is distributed to the ovary, and fundus of the uterus.
  The superior mesenteric plexus (plexus mesentericus superior) is a continuation of the lower part of the celiac plexus, receiving a branch from the junction of the right vagus nerve with the plexus. It surrounds the superior mesenteric artery, accompanies it into the mesentery, and divides into a number of secondary plexuses, which are distributed to all the parts supplied by the artery, viz., pancreatic branches to the pancreas; intestinal branches to the small intestine; and ileocolic, right colic, and middle colic branches, which supply the corresponding parts of the great intestine. The nerves composing this plexus are white in color and firm in texture; in the upper part of the plexus close to the origin of the superior mesenteric artery is a ganglion (ganglion mesentericum superius).
  The abdominal aortic plexus (plexus aorticus abdominalis; aortic plexus) is formed by branches derived, on either side, from the celiac plexus and ganglia, and receives filaments from some of the lumbar ganglia. It is situated upon the sides and front of the aorta, between the origins of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries. From this plexus arise part of the spermatic, the inferior mesenteric, and the hypogastric plexuses; it also distributes filaments to the inferior vena cava.
  The inferior mesenteric plexus (plexus mesentericus inferior) is derived chiefly from the aortic plexus. It surrounds the inferior mesenteric artery, and divides into a number of secondary plexuses, which are distributed to all the parts supplied by the artery, viz., the left colic and sigmoid plexuses, which supply the descending and sigmoid parts of the colon; and the superior hemorrhoidal plexus, which supplies the rectum and joins in the pelvis with branches from the pelvic plexuses.

The Hypogastric Plexus (Plexus Hypogastricus)(Fig. 838).—The hypogastric plexus is situated in front of the last lumbar vertebra and the promontory of the sacrum, between the two common iliac arteries, and is formed by the union of numerous filaments, which descend on either side from the aortic plexus, and from the lumbar ganglia; it divides, below, into two lateral portions which are named the pelvic plexuses.

The Pelvic Plexuses (Fig. 838).—The pelvic plexuses supply the viscera of the pelvic cavity, and are situated at the sides of the rectum in the male, and at the sides of the rectum and vagina in the female. They are formed on either side by a continuation of the hypogastric plexus, by the sacral sympathetic efferent fibers

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