Reference > Anatomy of the Human Body > Page 985
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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
of the cardiac plexus are the superior cardiac nerve of the left sympathetic, and the lower of the two superior cervical cardiac branches from the left vagus, which pass to the superficial part of the plexus.
  The branches from the right half of the deep part of the cardiac plexus pass, some in front of, and others behind, the right pulmonary artery; the former, the more numerous, transmit a few filaments to the anterior pulmonary plexus, and are then continued onward to form part of the anterior coronary plexus; those behind the pulmonary artery distribute a few filaments to the right atrium, and are then continued onward to form part of the posterior coronary plexus.
  The left half of the deep part of the plexus is connected with the superficial part of the cardiac plexus, and gives filaments to the left atrium, and to the anterior pulmonary plexus, and is then continued to form the greater part of the posterior coronary plexus.
  The Posterior Coronary Plexus (plexus coronarius posterior; left coronary plexus) is larger than the anterior, and accompanies the left coronary artery; it is chiefly formed by filaments prolonged from the left half of the deep part of the cardiac plexus, and by a few from the right half. It gives branches to the left atrium and ventricle.
  The Anterior Coronary Plexus (plexus coronarius anterior; right coronary plexus) is formed partly from the superficial and partly from the deep parts of the cardiac plexus. It accompanies the right coronary artery, and gives branches to the right atrium and ventricle.

The Celiac Plexus (Plexus Cœliacus; Solar Plexus) (Figs. 838, 848)—The celiac plexus, the largest of the three sympathetic plexuses, is situated at the level of the upper part of the first lumbar vertebra and is composed of two large ganglia, the celiac ganglia, and a dense net-work of nerve fibers uniting them together. It surrounds the celiac artery and the root of the superior mesenteric artery. It lies behind the stomach and the omental bursa, in front of the crura of the diaphragm and the commencement of the abdominal aorta, and between the suprarenal glands. The plexus and the ganglia receive the greater and lesser splanchnic nerves of both sides and some filaments from the right vagus, and give off numerous secondary plexuses along the neighboring arteries.
  The Celiac Ganglia (ganglia cæliaca; semilunar ganglia) are two large irregularlyshaped masses having the appearance of lymph glands and placed one on either side of the middle line in front of the crura of the diaphragm close to the suprarenal glands, that on the right side being placed behind the inferior vena cava. The upper part of each ganglion is joined by the greater splanchnic nerve, while the lower part, which is segmented off and named the aorticorenal ganglion, receives the lesser splanchnic nerve and gives off the greater part of the renal plexus.
  The secondary plexuses springing from or connected with the celiac plexus are the
Phrenic.
Renal.
Hepatic.
Spermatic.
Lienal.
Superior mesenteric.
Superior gastric.
Abdominal aortic.
Suprarenal.
Inferior mesenteric.
  The phrenic plexus (plexus phrenicus) accompanies the inferior phrenic artery to the diaphragm, some filaments passing to the suprarenal gland. It arises from the upper part of the celiac ganglion, and is larger on the right than on the left side. It receives one or two branches from the phrenic nerve. At the point of junction of the right phrenic plexus with the phrenic nerve is a small ganglion

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