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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
joint of the great toe and sends a filament to the first Interosseous dorsalis muscle.
  The Superficial Peroneal Nerve (n. peronæus superficialis; musculocutaneous nerve) (Figs. 827, 835) supplies the Peronei longus and brevis and the skin over the greater part of the dorsum of the foot. It passes forward between the Peronæi and the Extensor digitorum longus, pierces the deep fascia at the lower third of the leg, and divides into a medial and an intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve. In its course between the muscles, the nerve gives off muscular branches to the Peronæi longus and brevis, and cutaneous filaments to the integument of the lower part of the leg.


FIG. 836– Nerves of the dorsum of the foot. (Testut.) (See enlarged image)

  The medial dorsal cutaneous nerve (n. cutaneus dorsalis medialis; internal dorsal cutaneous branch) passes in front of the ankle-joint, and divides into two dorsal digital branches, one of which supplies the medial side of the great toe, the other, the adjacent side of the second and third toes. It also supplies the integument of the medial side of the foot and ankle, and communicates with the saphenous nerve, and with the deep peroneal nerve (Fig. 825).
  The intermediate dorsal cutaneous nerve (n. cutaneus dorsalis intermedius; external dorsal cutaneous branch), the smaller, passes along the lateral part of the dorsum of the foot, and divides into dorsal digital branches, which supply the contiguous sides of the third and fourth, and of the fourth and fifth toes. It also supplies the skin of the lateral side of the foot and ankle, and communicates with the sural nerve (Fig. 825). The branches of the superficial peroneal nerve supply the skin of the dorsal surfaces of all the toes excepting the lateral side of the little toe, and the adjoining sides of the great and second toes, the former being supplied by the lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve from the sural nerve, and the latter by the medial branch of the deep peroneal nerve. Frequently some of the lateral branches of the superficial peroneal are absent, and their places are then taken by branches of the sural nerve.

The Pudendal Plexus (plexus pudendus) (Fig. 828).—The pudendal plexus is not sharply marked off from the sacral plexus, and as a consequence some of the branches which spring from it may arise in conjunction with those of the sacral plexus. It lies on the posterior wall of the pelvis, and is usually formed by branches from the anterior divisions of the second and third sacral nerves, the whole of the anterior divisions of the fourth and fifth sacral nerves, and the coccygeal nerve.

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