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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
It is the largest of the three divisions of the fifth, and is made up of two roots: a large, sensory root proceeding from the inferior angle of the semilunar ganglion, and a small motor root (the motor part of the trigeminal), which passes beneath the ganglion, and unites with the sensory root, just after its exit through the foramen ovale. Immediately beneath the base of the skull, the nerve gives off from its medial side a recurrent branch (nervus spinosus) and the nerve to the Pterygoideus internus, and then divides into two trunks, an anterior and a posterior.
  The Nervus Spinosus (recurrent or meningeal branch) enters the skull through the foramen spinosum with the middle meningeal artery. It divides into two branches, anterior and posterior, which accompany the main divisions of the artery and supply the dura mater; the posterior branch also supplies the mucous lining of the mastoid cells; the anterior communicates with the meningeal branch of the maxillary nerve.


FIG. 781– Mandibular division of the trifacial nerve. (Testut.) (See enlarged image)


The Internal Pterygoid Nerve (n. pterygoideus internus).—The nerve to the Pterygoideus internus is a slender branch, which enters the deep surface of the muscle; it gives off one or two filaments to the otic ganglion.
  The anterior and smaller division of the mandibular nerve receives nearly the whole of the fibers of the motor root of the nerve, and supplies the muscles of mastication and the skin and mucous membrane of the cheek. Its branches are the masseteric, deep temporal, buccinator, and external pterygoid.
  The Masseteric Nerve (n. massetericus) passes lateralward, above the Pterygoideus externus, in front of the temporomandibular articulation, and behind the tendon of the Temporalis; it crosses the mandibular notch with the masseteric artery, to the deep surface of the Masseter, in which it ramifies nearly as far as its anterior border. It gives a filament to the temporomandibular joint.

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