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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
middle and lateral sacral arteries; they receive lymphatics from the rectum and posterior wall of the pelvis.
  The efferents of the hypogastric group end in the common iliac glands.
  The Lumbar Glands (lymphoglandulæ lumbales) are very numerous, and consist of right and left lateral aortic, preaortic, and retroaortic groups.


FIG. 612– Iliopelvic glands (lateral view). (Cunéo and Marcille.) (See enlarged image)

  The right lateral aortic glands are situated partly in front of the inferior vena cava, near the termination of the renal vein, and partly behind it on the origin of the Psoas major, and on the right crus of the diaphragm. The left lateral aortic glands form a chain on the left side of the abdominal aorta in front of the origin of the Psoas major and left crus of the diaphragm. The glands on either side receive (a) the efferents of the common iliac glands, (b) the lymphatics from the testis in the male and from the ovary, uterine tube, and body of the uterus in the female; (c) the lymphatics from the kidney and suprarenal gland; and (d) the lymphatics draining the lateral abdominal muscles and accompanying the lumbar veins. Most of the efferent vessels of the lateral aortic glands converge to form the right and left lumbar trunks which join the cisterna chyli, but some enter the pre- and retroaortic glands, and others pierce the crura of the diaphragm to join the lower end of the thoracic duct. The preaortic glands lie in front of the aorta, and may be divided into celiac, superior mesenteric, and inferior mesenteric groups, arranged around the origins of the corresponding arteries. They receive a few vessels from the lateral aortic glands, but their principal afferents are derived from the viscera supplied by the three arteries with which they are associated. Some of their efferents pass to the retroaortic glands, but the majority unite to form the intestinal trunk, which enters the cisterna chyli. The retroaortic glands are placed

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