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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
between the Stylohyoideus and internal jugular vein to the uppermost of the superior deep cervical glands. They end in a gland which lies at the side of the posterior belly of the Digastricus, on the internal jugular vein; occasionally one or two additional vessels run to small glands on the lateral side of the vein under cover of the Sternocleidomastoideus.


FIG. 605– Lymphatics of the tongue. (Poirier and Charpy.) (See enlarged image)

  The lymphatic vessels of the tongue (Fig. 605) are drained chiefly into the deep cervical glands lying between the posterior belly of the Digastricus and the superior belly of the Omohyoideus; one gland situated at the bifurcation of the common carotid artery is so intimately associated with these vessels that it is known as the principal gland of the tongue. The lymphatic vessels of the tongue may be divided into four groups: (1) apical, from the tip of the tongue to the suprahyoid glands and principal gland of the tongue; (2) lateral, from the margin of the tongue—some of these pierce the Mylohyoideus to end in the submaxillary glands, others pass down on the Hyoglossus to the superior deep cervical glands; (3) basal, from the region of the vallate papillæ to the superior deep cervical glands; and (4) median, a few of which perforate the Mylohyoideus to reach the submaxillary glands, while the majority turn around the posterior border of the muscle to enter the superior deep cervical glands.

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