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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
it divides into a number of branches which are distributed to the lateral surface of the cerebral hemisphere.

Branches.—The branches of this vessel are the:
Antero-lateral Ganglionic.
Ascending Parietal.
Inferior Lateral Frontal.
Parietotemporal.
Ascending Frontal.
Temporal.


FIG. 517– Outer surface of cerebral hemisphere, showing areas supplied by cerebral arteries. (See enlarged image)



FIG. 518– Medial surface of cerebral hemisphere, showing areas supplied by cerebral arteries. (See enlarged image)

  The Antero-lateral Ganglionic Branches, a group of small arteries which arise at the commencement of the middle cerebral artery, are arranged in two sets: one, the internal striate, passes upward through the inner segments of the lentiform nucleus, and supplies it, the caudate nucleus, and the internal capsule; the other, the external striate, ascends through the outer segment of the lentiform nucleus, and supplies the caudate nucleus and the thalamus. One artery of this group is of larger size than the rest, and is of special importance, as being the artery in the brain most frequently ruptured; it has been termed by Charcot the artery of cerebral hemorrhage. It ascends between the lentiform nucleus and the external capsule, and ends in the caudate nucleus. The inferior lateral frontal supplies the inferior frontal gyrus (Broca’s convolution) and the lateral part of the orbital surface of the frontal lobe. The ascending frontal supplies the anterior central gyrus. The ascending parietal is distributed to the posterior central gyrus and the lower part of the superior parietal lobule. The parietotemporal supplies the supramarginal and angular gyri, and the posterior parts of the superior and middle temporal gyri. The temporal branches, two or three in number, are distributed to the lateral surface of the temporal lobe.
  10. The posterior communicating artery (a. communicans posterior) (Fig. 516) runs backward from the internal carotid, and anastomoses with the posterior

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