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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
form a sling-like fasciculus, which encircles the neck of the radius above the tuberosity and is attached to the back part of its medial surface; the greater part of this portion of the muscle is inserted into the dorsal and lateral surfaces of the body of the radius, midway between the oblique line and the head of the bone.
  The Abductor pollicis longus (Extensor oss. metacarpi pollicis) lies immediately below the Supinator and is sometimes united with it. It arises from the lateral part of the dorsal surface of the body of the ulna below the insertion of the Anconæus, from the interosseous membrane, and from the middle third of the dorsal surface of the body of the radius. Passing obliquely downward and lateralward, it ends in a tendon, which runs through a groove on the lateral side of the lower end of the radius, accompanied by the tendon of the Extensor pollicis brevis, and is inserted into the radial side of the base of the first metacarpal bone. It occasionally gives off two slips near its insertion: one to the greater multangular bone and the other to blend with the origin of the Abductor pollicis brevis.

Variations.—More or less doubling of muscle and tendon with insertion of the extra tendon into the first metacarpal, the greater multangular, or into the Abductor pollicis brevis or Opponens pollicis.


FIG. 420– The Supinator. (See enlarged image)

  The Extensor pollicis brevis (Extensor primi internodii pollicis) lies on the medial side of, and is closely connected with, the Abductor pollicis longus. It arises from the dorsal surface of the body of the radius below that muscle, and from the interosseous membrane. Its direction is similar to that of the Abductor pollicis longus, its tendon passing the same groove on the lateral side of the lower end of the radius, to be inserted into the base of the first phalanx of the thumb.

Variations.—Absence; fusion of tendon with that of the Extensor pollicis longus.
  The Extensor pollicis longus (Extensor secundi internodii pollicis) is much larger than the preceding muscle, the origin of which it partly covers. It arises from the lateral part of the middle third of the dorsal surface of the body of the ulna below the origin of the Abductor pollicis longus, and from the interosseous membrane. It ends in a tendon, which passes through a separate compartment in the dorsal carpal ligament, lying in a narrow, oblique groove on the back of the lower end of the radius. It then crosses obliquely the tendons of the Extensores carpi radialis longus and brevis, and is separated from the Extensor brevis pollicis by a triangular interval, in which the radial artery is found; and is finally inserted into the base of the last phalanx of the thumb. The radial artery is crossed by the

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