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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
weak point in the abdominal wall. Lateral to the falx is a ligamentous band connected with the lower margin of the Transversus and extending down in front of the inferior epigastric artery to the superior ramus of the pubis; it is termed the interfoveolar ligament of Hesselbach (Fig. 398) and sometimes contains a few muscular fibers.


FIG. 397– The Transversus abdominis, Rectus abdominis, and Pyramidalis. (See enlarged image)

  The Rectus abdominis (Fig. 397) is a long flat muscle, which extends along the whole length of the front of the abdomen, and is separated from its fellow of the opposite side by the linea alba. It is much broader, but thinner, above than below, and arises by two tendons; the lateral or larger is attached to the crest of the pubis, the medial interlaces with its fellow of the opposite side, and is connected with the ligaments covering the front of the symphysis pubis. The muscle is inserted by three portions of unequal size into the cartilages of the fifth, sixth, and seventh ribs. The upper portion, attached principally to the cartilage of the

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