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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  4. Telophase.—The cell protoplasm begins to appear constricted around the equator of the achromatic spindle, where double rows of granules are also sometimes seen. The constriction deepens and the original cell gradually becomes divided into two new cells, each with its own nucleus and centrosome, which assume the ordinary positions occupied by such structures in the resting stage. The nuclear membrane and nucleolus are also differentiated during this phase.


FIG. 2– Diagram showing the changes which occur in the centrosomes and nucleus of a cell in the process of mitotic division. (Schäfer.) I to III, prophase; IV, metaphase; V and VI, anaphase; VII and VIII, telophase. (See enlarged image)

 
2. The Ovum
 
  The ova are developed from the primitive germ cells which are imbedded in the substance of the ovaries. Each primitive germ cell gives rise, by repeated divisions, to a number of smaller cells termed oögonia, from which the ova or primary oöcytes are developed.
  Human ova are extremely minute, measuring about 0.2 mm. in diameter, and are enclosed within the egg follicles of the ovaries; as a rule each follicle contain

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