Reference > Anatomy of the Human Body > Page 379
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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
which covers the whole of one side of the vertex of the skull, from the occipital bone to the eyebrow. It consists of two parts, the Occipitalis and the Frontalis, connected by an intervening tendinous aponeurosis, the galea aponeurotica.
  The Occipitalis, thin and quadrilateral in form, arises by tendinous fibers from the lateral two-thirds of the superior nuchal line of the occipital bone, and from the mastoid part of the temporal. It ends in the galea aponeurotica.


FIG. 378– Muscles of the head, face, and neck. (See enlarged image)

  The Frontalis is thin, of a quadrilateral form, and intimately adherent to the superficial fascia. It is broader than the Occipitalis and its fibers are longer and paler in color. It has no bony attachments. Its medial fibers are continuous with those of the Procerus; its immediate fibers blend with the Corrugator and Orbicularis oculi; and its lateral fibers are also blended with the latter muscle over the zygomatic process of the frontal bone. From these attachments the fibers are directed upward, and join the galea aponeurotica below the coronal suture.

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