Reference > Anatomy of the Human Body > Page 271
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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
bone: the rest of this surface is rough for the attachment of ligaments and part of the tendon of the Peronæus longus. The anterior surface, kidney-shaped and much larger than the posterior, articulates with the first metatarsal bone. The posterior surface is triangular, concave, and articulates with the most medial and largest of the three facets on the anterior surface of the navicular. The plantar surface is rough, and forms the base of the wedge; at its back part is a tuberosity for the insertion of part of the tendon of the Tibialis posterior. It also gives insertion in front to part of the tendon of the Tibialis anterior. The dorsal surface is the narrow end of the wedge, and is directed upward and lateralward; it is rough for the attachment of ligaments.

Articulations.—The first cuneiform articulates with four bones: the navicular, second cuneiform, and first and second metatarsals.

The Second Cuneiform Bone (os cuneiforme secundum; middle cuneiform) (Figs. 280, 281).—The second cuneiform bone, the smallest of the three, is of very regular wedge-like form, the thin end being directed downward. It is situated between the other two cuneiforms, and articulates with the navicular behind, and the second metatarsal in front.

Surfaces.—The anterior surface, triangular in form, and narrower than the posterior, articulates with the base of the second metatarsal bone. The posterior surface, also triangular, articulates with the intermediate facet on the anterior surface of the navicular. The medial surface carries an L-shaped articular facet, running along the superior and posterior borders, for articulation with the first cuneiform, and is rough in the rest of its extent for the attachment of ligaments. The lateral surface presents posteriorly a smooth facet for articulation with the third cuneiform bone. The dorsal surface forms the base of the wedge; it is quadrilateral and rough for the attachment of ligaments. The plantar surface, sharp and tuberculated, is also rough for the attachment of ligaments, and for the insertion of a slip from the tendon of the Tibialis posterior.


FIG. 280– The left second cuneiform. Antero-medial view. (See enlarged image)



FIG. 281– The left second cuneiform. Postero-lateral view. (See enlarged image)


Articulations.—The second cuneiform articulates with four bones: the navicular, first and third cuneiforms, and second metatarsal.

The Third Cuneiform Bone (os cuneiforme tertium; external cuneiform) (Figs. 282, 283).—The third cuneiform bone, intermediate in size between the two preceding, is wedge-shaped, the base being uppermost. It occupies the center of the front row of the tarsal bones, between the second cuneiform medially, the cuboid laterally, the navicular behind, and the third metatarsal in front.

Surfaces.—The anterior surface, triangular in form, articulates with the third metatarsal bone. The posterior surface articulates with the lateral facet on the anterior surface of the navicular, and is rough below for the attachment of ligamentous fibers. The medial surface presents an anterior and a posterior articular facet, separated by a rough depression: the anterior, sometimes divided, articulates with the lateral side of the base of the second metatarsal bone; the posterior skirts the posterior border, and articulates with the second cuneiform; the rough depression gives attachment to an interosseous ligament. The lateral surface also presents two articular facets, separated by a rough non-articular area; the anterior facet, situated at the superior angle of the bone, is small and semi-oval in shape, and articulates with the medial side of the base of the fourth metatarsal bone;

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