Reference > Anatomy of the Human Body > Page 1129
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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
hyoid bone. In either half there are two sets of muscles, extrinsic and intrinsic; the former have their origins outside the tongue, the latter are contained entirely within it.
  The extrinsic muscles (Fig. 1019) are:
Genioglossus.
Hyoglossus.
Chondroglossus.
Styloglossus.
  Glossopalatinus. 1


FIG. 1019– Extrinsic muscles of the tongue. Left side. (See enlarged image)

  The Genioglossus (Geniohyoglossus) is a flat triangular muscle close to and parallel with the median plane, its apex corresponding with its point of origin from the mandible, its base with its insertion into the tongue and hyoid bone. It arises by a short tendon from the superior mental spine on the inner surface of the symphysis menti, immediately above the Geniohyoideus, and from this point spreads out in a fan-like form. The inferior fibers extend downward, to be attached by a thin aponeurosis to the upper part of the body of the hyoid bone, a few passing between the Hyoglossus and Chondroglossus to blend with the Constrictores pharyngis; the middle fibers pass backward, and the superior ones upward and forward, to enter the whole length of the under surface of the tongue, from the root to the apex. The muscles of opposite sides are separated at their insertions by the median fibrous septum of the tongue; in front, they are more or less blended owing to the decussation of fasciculi in the median plane.
  The Hyoglossus, thin and quadrilateral, arises from the side of the body and from the whole length of the greater cornu of the hyoid bone, and passes almost vertically upward to enter the side of the tongue, between the Styloglossus and Longitudinalis inferior. The fibers arising from the body of the hyoid bone overlap those from the greater cornu.
Note 1.  The Glossopalatinus (Palatoglossus), although one of the muscles of the tongue, is more closely associated with the soft palate both in situation and function; it has consequently been described with the muscles of that structure (p. 1139). [back]

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