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Henry Gray (1825–1861).  Anatomy of the Human Body.  1918.
 
  The Lips (labia oris), the two fleshy folds which surround the rima or orifice of the mouth, are formed externally of integument and internally of mucous membrane, between which are found the Orbicularis oris muscle, the labial vessels, some nerves, areolar tissue, and fat, and numerous small labial glands. The inner surface of each lip is connected in the middle line to the corresponding gum by a fold of mucous membrane, the frenulum—the upper being the larger.


FIG. 994– Sagittal section of nose mouth, pharynx, and larynx. (See enlarged image)

  The Labial Glands (glandulœ labiales) are situated between the mucous membrane and the Orbicularis oris, around the orifice of the mouth. They are circular in form, and about the size of small peas; their ducts open by minute orifices upon the mucous membrane. In structure they resemble the salivary glands.

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