Verse > Anthologies > Francis T. Palgrave, ed. > The Golden Treasury
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
Francis T. Palgrave, ed. (1824–1897). The Golden Treasury.  1875.
 
Lord Byron
 
CLXIX. All for Love
 
O TALK not to me of a name great in story; 
The days of our youth are the days of our glory; 
And the myrtle and ivy of sweet two-and-twenty 
Are worth all your laurels, though ever so plenty. 
  
What are garlands and crowns to the brow that is wrinkled?         5
'Tis but as a dead flower with May-dew besprinkled: 
Then away with all such from the head that is hoary— 
What care I for the wreaths that can only give glory? 
  
O Fame! if I e'er took delight in thy praises, 
'Twas less for the sake of thy high-sounding phrases,  10
Than to see the bright eyes of the dear one discover 
She thought that I was not unworthy to love her. 
  
There chiefly I sought thee, there only I found thee; 
Her glance was the best of the rays that surround thee; 
When it sparkled o'er aught that was bright in my story,  15
I knew it was love, and I felt it was glory. 
 
 
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD
  PREVIOUSNEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors