Verse > Anthologies > Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. > The Oxford Book of English Verse
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Arthur Quiller-Couch, ed. 1919. The Oxford Book of English Verse: 1250–1900.
  
Jeremiah Joseph Callanan. 1795–1839
  
638. The Outlaw of Loch Lene
FROM THE IRISH
  
O MANY a day have I made good ale in the glen, 
That came not of stream or malt, like the brewing of men: 
My bed was the ground; my roof, the green-wood above; 
And the wealth that I sought, one far kind glance from my Love. 
 
Alas! on that night when the horses I drove from the field,         5
That I was not near from terror my angel to shield! 
She stretch'd forth her arms; her mantle she flung to the wind, 
And swam o'er Loch Lene, her outlaw'd lover to find. 
 
O would that a freezing sleet-wing'd tempest did sweep, 
And I and my love were alone, far off on the deep;  10
I'd ask not a ship, or a bark, or a pinnace, to save— 
With her hand round my waist, I'd fear not the wind or the wave. 
 
'Tis down by the lake where the wild tree fringes its sides, 
The maid of my heart, my fair one of Heaven resides: 
I think, as at eve she wanders its mazes among,  15
The birds go to sleep by the sweet wild twist of her song. 
 
 
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