Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 976
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 976
 
 
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. (1547–1616) (continued)
 
9461
    Sancho Panza by name, is my own self, if I was not changed in my cradle.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxx.
9462
    “Sit there, clod-pate!” cried he; “for let me sit wherever I will, that will still be the upper end, and the place of worship to thee.” 1
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxi.
9463
    Building castles in the air, 2 and making yourself a laughing-stock.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxi.
9464
    It is good to live and learn.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxii.
9465
    He is as mad as a March hare. 3
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9466
    I must follow him through thick and thin. 4
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9467
    There is no love lost between us. 5
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9468
    In the night all cats are gray. 6
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9469
    All is not gold that glisters. 7
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9470
    I can look sharp as well as another, and let me alone to keep the cobwebs out of my eyes.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9471
    Honesty is the best policy.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9472
    Time ripens all things. No man is born wise.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9473
    A good name is better than riches. 8
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9474
    I drink when I have occasion, and sometimes when I have no occasion.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9475
    An honest man’s word is as good as his bond.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiii.
9476
    Heaven’s help is better than early rising.
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxiv.
9477
    I have other fish to fry. 9
          Don Quixote. Part ii. Chap. xxxv.
 
Note 1.
Sit thee down, chaff-threshing churl! for let me sit where I will, that is the upper end to thee.—Jarvis’s translation.

This is generally placed in the mouth of Macgregor: “Where Macgregor sits, there is the head of the table.” Emerson quotes it, in his “American Scholar,” as the saying of Macdonald, and Theodore Parker as the saying of the Highlander. [back]
Note 2.
See Burton, Quotation 21. [back]
Note 3.
See Heywood, Quotation 112. [back]
Note 4.
See Spenser, Quotation 15. [back]
Note 5.
See Middleton, Quotation 18. [back]
Note 6.
See Heywood, Quotation 32. [back]
Note 7.
See Chaucer, Quotation 40. [back]
Note 8.
See Publius Syrus, Quotation 9. [back]
Note 9.
See Rabelais, Quotation 49. [back]
 

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