Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 971
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 971
 
 
Miguel de Cervantes Saavedra. (1547–1616) (continued)
 
9386
    As ill-luck would have it. 1
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book i. Chap. ii.
9387
    The brave man carves out his fortune, and every man is the son of his own works. 2
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book i. Chap. iv.
9388
    Which I have earned with the sweat of my brows.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book i. Chap. iv.
9389
    Can we ever have too much of a good thing? 3
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book i. Chap. vi.
9390
    The charging of his enemy was but the work of a moment.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book i. Chap. viii.
9391
    And had a face like a blessing. 4
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book ii. Chap. iv.
9392
    It is a true saying that a man must eat a peck of salt with his friend before he knows him.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. i.
9393
    Fortune leaves always some door open to come at a remedy.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. i.
9394
    Fair and softly goes far.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. ii.
9395
    Plain as the nose on a man’s face. 5
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. iv.
9396
    Let me leap out of the frying-pan into the fire; 6 or, out of God’s blessing into the warm sun. 7
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. iv.
9397
    You are taking the wrong sow by the ear. 8
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. iv.
9398
    Bell, book, and candle.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. iv.
9399
    Let the worst come to the worst. 9
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. v.
9400
    You are come off now with a whole skin.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. v.
9401
    Fear is sharp-sighted, and can see things under ground, and much more in the skies.
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. vi.
9402
    Ill-luck, you know, seldom comes alone. 10
          Don Quixote. Part i. Book. iii. Chap. vi.
 
Note 1.
See Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Quotation 27. [back]
Note 2.
See Bacon, Quotation 28. [back]
Note 3.
See Shakespeare, As You Like It, Quotation 59. [back]
Note 4.
He had a face like a benediction.—Jarvis’s translation. [back]
Note 5.
See Shakespeare, The Two Gentlemen of Verona, Quotation 5. [back]
Note 6.
See Heywood, Quotation 110. [back]
Note 7.
See Heywood, Quotation 101. [back]
Note 8.
See Heywood, Quotation 124. [back]
Note 9.
See Middleton, Quotation 7. [back]
Note 10.
See Shakespeare, Hamlet, Quotation 196. [back]
 

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