Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 941
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 941
 
 
Marcus Aurelius. (121–180) (continued)
 
9060
    Look to the essence of a thing, whether it be a point of doctrine, of practice, or of interpretation.
          Meditations. viii. 22.
9061
    A man’s happiness,—to do the things proper to man.
          Meditations. viii. 26.
9062
    Be not careless in deeds, nor confused in words, nor rambling in thought.
          Meditations. viii. 51.
9063
    He that knows not what the world is, knows not where he is himself. He that knows not for what he was made, knows not what he is nor what the world is.
          Meditations. viii. 52.
9064
    The nature of the universe is the nature of things that are. Now, things that are have kinship with things that are from the beginning. Further, this nature is styled Truth; and it is the first cause of all that is true.
          Meditations. ix. 1.
9065
    He would be the finer gentleman that should leave the world without having tasted of lying or pretence of any sort, or of wantonness or conceit.
          Meditations. ix. 2.
9066
    Think not disdainfully of death, but look on it with favour; for even death is one of the things that Nature wills.
          Meditations. ix. 3.
9067
    A wrong-doer is often a man that has left something undone, not always he that has done something.
          Meditations. ix. 5.
9068
    Blot out vain pomp; check impulse; quench appetite; keep reason under its own control.
          Meditations. ix. 7.
9069
    Things that have a common quality ever quickly seek their kind.
          Meditations. ix. 9.
9070
    All things are the same,—familiar in enterprise, momentary in endurance, coarse in substance. All things now are as they were in the day of those whom we have buried.
          Meditations. ix. 14.
9071
    The happiness and unhappiness of the rational, social animal depends not on what he feels but on what he does; just as his virtue and vice consist not in feeling but in doing.
          Meditations. ix. 16.
 

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