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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 918
 
 
Plutarch. (A.D. 46?–A.D. c. 120) (continued)
 
8842
    He made one of Antipater’s recommendation a judge; and perceiving afterwards that his hair and beard were coloured, he removed him, saying, “I could not think one that was faithless in his hair could be trusty in his deeds.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 1 Philip.
8843
    Being nimble and light-footed, his father encouraged him to run in the Olympic race. “Yes,” said he, “if there were any kings there to run with me.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 2 Alexander.
8844
    When Darius offered him ten thousand talents, and to divide Asia equally with him, “I would accept it,” said Parmenio, “were I Alexander.” “And so truly would I,” said Alexander, “if I were Parmenio.” But he answered Darius that the earth could not bear two suns, nor Asia two kings.
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 3 Alexander.
8845
    When he was wounded with an arrow in the ankle, and many ran to him that were wont to call him a god, he said smiling, “That is blood, as you see, and not, as Homer saith, ‘such humour as distils from blessed gods.’”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 4 Alexander.
8846
    Aristodemus, a friend of Antigonus, supposed to be a cook’s son, advised him to moderate his gifts and expenses. “Thy words,” said he, “Aristodemus, smell of the apron.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 5 Antigonus I.
8847
    Thrasyllus the Cynic begged a drachm of Antigonus. “That,” said he, “is too little for a king to give.” “Why, then,” said the other, “give me a talent.” “And that,” said he, “is too much for a Cynic (or, for a dog) to receive.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 6 Antigonus I.
8848
    Antagoras the poet was boiling a conger, and Antigonus, coming behind him as he was stirring his skillet, said, “Do you think, Antagoras, that Homer boiled congers when he wrote the deeds of Agamemnon?” Antagoras replied, “Do you think, O king, that Agamemnon, when he did such exploits, was a peeping in his army to see who boiled congers?”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 7 Antigonus I.
 
Note 1.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 2.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 3.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 4.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 5.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 6.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 7.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
 

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