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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 917
 
 
Plutarch. (A.D. 46?–A.D. c. 120) (continued)
 
8834
    Scilurus on his death-bed, being about to leave four-score sons surviving, offered a bundle of darts to each of them, and bade them break them. When all refused, drawing out one by one, he easily broke them,—thus teaching them that if they held together, they would continue strong; but if they fell out and were divided, they would become weak.
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 1 Scilurus.
8835
    Dionysius the Elder, being asked whether he was at leisure, he replied, “God forbid that it should ever befall me!”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 2 Dionysius.
8836
    A prating barber asked Archelaus how he would be trimmed. He answered, “In silence.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 3 Archelaus.
8837
    When Philip had news brought him of divers and eminent successes in one day, “O Fortune!” said he, “for all these so great kindnesses do me some small mischief.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 4 Philip.
8838
    There were two brothers called Both and Either; perceiving Either was a good, understanding, busy fellow, and Both a silly fellow and good for little, Philip said, “Either is both, and Both is neither.”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 5 Philip.
8839
    Philip being arbitrator betwixt two wicked persons, he commanded one to fly out of Macedonia and the other to pursue him.
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 6 Philip.
8840
    Being about to pitch his camp in a likely place, and hearing there was no hay to be had for the cattle, “What a life,” said he, “is ours, since we must live according to the convenience of asses!”
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 7 Philip.
8841
    “These Macedonians,” said he, “are a rude and clownish people, that call a spade a spade.” 8
          Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. 9 Philip.
 
Note 1.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 2.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 3.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 4.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 5.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 6.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 7.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
Note 8.
[greek].—Aristophanes, as quoted in Lucian, Quom. Hist. sit conscrib. 41.

Brought up like a rude Macedon, and taught to call a spade a spade.—Gosson: Ephemerides of Phialo (1579). [back]
Note 9.
Rejected by some critics as not a genuine work of Plutarch.—Ralph Waldo Emerson. [back]
 

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