Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 914
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 914
 
 
Plutarch. (A.D. 46?–A.D. c. 120) (continued)
 
8799
    “And this,” said Cæsar, “you know, young man, is more disagreeable for me to say than to do.” 1
          Life of Cæsar.
8800
    Go on, my friend, and fear nothing; you carry Cæsar and his fortunes in your boat. 2
          Life of Cæsar.
8801
    Cæsar said to the soothsayer, “The ides of March are come;” who answered him calmly, “Yes, they are come, but they are not past.” 3
          Life of Cæsar.
8802
    Even a nod from a person who is esteemed is of more force than a thousand arguments or studied sentences from others.
          Life of Phocion.
8803
    Demosthenes told Phocion, “The Athenians will kill you some day when they once are in a rage.” “And you,” said he, “if they are once in their senses.” 4
          Life of Phocion.
8804
    Pythias once, scoffing at Demosthenes, said that his arguments smelt of the lamp.
          Life of Demosthenes.
8805
    Demosthenes overcame and rendered more distinct his inarticulate and stammering pronunciation by speaking with pebbles in his mouth.
          Life of Demosthenes.
8806
    In his house he had a large looking-glass, before which he would stand and go through his exercises.
          Life of Demosthenes.
8807
    Cicero called Aristotle a river of flowing gold, and said of Plato’s Dialogues, that if Jupiter were to speak, it would be in language like theirs.
          Life of Cicero.
8808
    For water continually dropping will wear hard rocks hollow. 5
          Of the Training of Children.
 
Note 1.
Cæsar said to Metellus, “This, young man, is harder for me to say than do.”—Roman Apophthegms. (Cæsar.) [back]
Note 2.
Trust Fortune, and know that you carry Cæsar—Ibid. [back]
Note 3.
See Shakespeare, Julius Cæsar, Quotation 27. [back]
Note 4.
Demosthenes the orator told Phocion, “If the Athenians should be mad, they would kill you.” “Like enough.” said he.—“me if they were mad, but you if they were wise.”—Apophthegms of Kings and Great Commanders. (Phocion.) [back]
Note 5.
See Lyly, Quotation 8. [back]
 

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