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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 898
 
 
Publius Syrus. (42 B.C.) (continued)
 
8658
    He bids fair to grow wise who has discovered that he is not so.
          Maxim 598.
8659
    A guilty conscience never feels secure. 1
          Maxim 617.
8660
    Every day should be passed as if it were to be our last. 2
          Maxim 633.
8661
    Familiarity breeds contempt. 3
          Maxim 640.
8662
    Money alone sets all the world in motion.
          Maxim 656.
8663
    He who has plenty of pepper will pepper his cabbage.
          Maxim 673.
8664
    You should go to a pear-tree for pears, not to an elm. 4
          Maxim 674.
8665
    It is a very hard undertaking to seek to please everybody.
          Maxim 675.
8666
    We should provide in peace what we need in war. 5
          Maxim 709.
8667
    Look for a tough wedge for a tough log.
          Maxim 723.
8668
    How happy the life unembarrassed by the cares of business!
          Maxim 725.
8669
    They who plough the sea do not carry the winds in their hands. 6
          Maxim 759.
8670
    He gets through too late who goes too fast.
          Maxim 767.
8671
    In every enterprise consider where you would come out. 7
          Maxim 777.
 
Note 1.
See Shakespeare, Hamlet, Quotation 109. [back]
Note 2.
Thou wilt find rest from vain fancies if thou doest every act in life as though it were thy last.—Marcus Aurelius Antoninus: Meditations, ii. 5. [back]
Note 3.
See Shakespeare, The Merry Wives of Windsor, Quotation 7. [back]
Note 4.
You may as well expect pears from an elm.—Cervantes: Don Quixote, part ii. book ii. chap. xl. [back]
Note 5.
See Washington, Quotation 2. [back]
Note 6.
The pilot cannot mitigate the billows or calm the winds.—Plutarch: Of the Tranquillity of the Mind. [back]
Note 7.
In every affair consider what precedes and what follows, and then undertake it.—Epictetus: That everything is to be undertaken with circumspection, chap. xv. [back]
 

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