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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 63
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
667
    Hanging and wiving goes by destiny. 1
          The Merchant of Venice. Act ii. Sc. 9.
668
    If my gossip Report be an honest woman of her word.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.
669
    If it will feed nothing else, it will feed my revenge.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.
670
    I am a Jew. Hath not a Jew eyes? Hath not a Jew hands, organs, dimensions, senses, affections, passions?
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.
671
    The villany you teach me I will execute, and it shall go hard, but I will better the instruction.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 1.
672
    Makes a swan-like end,
Fading in music. 2
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.
673
    Tell me where is fancy bred,
  Or in the heart or in the head?
How begot, how nourished?
  Reply, reply.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.
674
    In law, what plea so tainted and corrupt
But being season’d with a gracious voice
Obscures the show of evil?
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.
675
    There is no vice so simple but assumes
Some mark of virtue in his outward parts.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.
676
    Thus ornament is but the guiled shore
To a most dangerous sea.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.
677
    The seeming truth which cunning times put on
To entrap the wisest.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act iii. Sc. 2.
 
Note 1.
See Heywood, Quotation 18. [back]
Note 2.
I will play the swan and die in music.—Othello, act v. sc. 2.
I am the cygnet to this pale faint swan,
Who chants a doleful hymn to his own death.
King John, act v. sc. 7.

There, swan-like, let me sing and die.—Lord Byron: Don Juan, canto iii. st. 86.

You think that upon the score of fore-knowledge and divining I am infinitely inferior to the swans. When they perceive approaching death they sing more merrily than before, because of the joy they have in going to the God they serve.—Socrates: In Phaedo, 77. [back]
 

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