Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 61
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 61
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
636
    The brain may devise laws for the blood, but a hot temper leaps o’er a cold decree.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.
637
    He doth nothing but talk of his horse.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.
638
    God made him, and therefore let him pass for a man.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.
639
    When he is best, he is a little worse than a man; and when he is worst, he is little better than a beast.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.
640
    I dote on his very absence.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 2.
641
    My meaning in saying he is a good man, is to have you understand me that he is sufficient.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
642
    Ships are but boards, sailors but men: there be land-rats and water-rats, water-thieves and land-thieves.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
643
    I will buy with you, sell with you, talk with you, walk with you, and so following; but I will not eat with you, drink with you, nor pray with you. What news on the Rialto?
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
644
    I will feed fat the ancient grudge I bear him.
He hates our sacred nation, and he rails,
Even there where merchants most do congregate.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
645
    The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
646
    A goodly apple rotten at the heart:
O, what a goodly outside falsehood hath!
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
647
    Many a time and oft
In the Rialto you have rated me.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
648
    For sufferance is the badge of all our tribe.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
649
    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
And spit upon my Jewish gaberdine.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
650
    Shall I bend low, and in a bondman’s key,
With bated breath and whispering humbleness.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
651
    For when did friendship take
A breed for barren metal of his friend?
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 3.
 

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