Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 59
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 59
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
614
    The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
Are of imagination all compact:
One sees more devils than vast hell can hold,
That is, the madman: the lover, all as frantic,
Sees Helen’s beauty in a brow of Egypt:
The poet’s eye, in a fine frenzy rolling,
Doth glance from heaven to earth, from earth to heaven;
And as imagination bodies forth
The forms of things unknown, the poet’s pen
Turns them to shapes, and gives to airy nothing
A local habitation and a name.
Such tricks hath strong imagination,
That if it would but apprehend some joy,
It comprehends some bringer of that joy;
Or in the night, imagining some fear,
How easy is a bush supposed a bear!
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
615
    For never anything can be amiss,
When simpleness and duty tender it.
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
616
    The true beginning of our end. 1
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
617
    The best in this kind are but shadows.
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
618
    A very gentle beast, and of a good conscience.
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
619
    This passion, and the death of a dear friend, would go near to make a man look sad.
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
620
    The iron tongue of midnight hath told twelve.
          A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Act v. Sc. 1.
621
    My ventures are not in one bottom trusted,
Nor to one place.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.
622
    Now, by two-headed Janus,
Nature hath framed strange fellows in her time.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.
623
    Though Nestor swear the jest be laughable.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.
624
    You have too much respect upon the world:
They lose it that do buy it with much care.
          The Merchant of Venice. Act i. Sc. 1.
 
Note 1.
I see the beginning of my end.—Philip Massinger: The Virgin Martyr. act iii. sc. 3. [back]
 

CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors