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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 53
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
531
    For it so falls out
That what we have we prize not to the worth
Whiles we enjoy it, but being lack’d and lost,
Why, then we rack the value; then we find
The virtue that possession would not show us
Whiles it was ours.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.
532
    The idea of her life shall sweetly creep
Into his study of imagination,
And every lovely organ of her life,
Shall come apparell’d in more precious habit,
More moving-delicate and full of life
Into the eye and prospect of his soul.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.
533
    Masters, it is proved already that you are little better than false knaves; and it will go near to be thought so shortly.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.
534
    The eftest way.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.
535
    Flat burglary as ever was committed.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.
536
    Condemned into everlasting redemption.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.
537
    O, that he were here to write me down an ass!
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.
538
    A fellow that hath had losses, and one that hath two gowns and every thing handsome about him.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 2.
539
    Patch grief with proverbs.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.
540
    Men
Can counsel and speak comfort to that grief
Which they themselves not feel.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.
541
    Charm ache with air, and agony with words.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.
542
    ’T is all men’s office to speak patience
To those that wring under the load of sorrow,
But no man’s virtue nor sufficiency
To be so moral when he shall endure
The like himself.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.
543
    For there was never yet philosopher
That could endure the toothache patiently.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act v. Sc. 1.
 

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