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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 52
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
516
    You shall comprehend all vagrom men.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
517
    2 Watch. How if a’ will not stand?
Dogb. Why, then, take no note of him, but let him go; and presently call the rest of the watch together, and thank God you are rid of a knave.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
518
    Is most tolerable, and not to be endured.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
519
    If they make you not then the better answer, you may say they are not the men you took them for.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
520
    The most peaceable way for you if you do take a thief, is to let him show himself what he is and steal out of your company.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
521
    I know that Deformed.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
522
    The fashion wears out more apparel than the man.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
523
    I thank God I am as honest as any man living that is an old man and no honester than I.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
524
    Comparisons are odorous.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 5.
525
    If I were as tedious as a king, I could find it in my heart to bestow it all of your worship.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 5.
526
    A good old man, sir; he will be talking: as they say, When the age is in the wit is out.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 5.
527
    O, what men dare do! what men may do! what men daily do, not knowing what they do!
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.
528
    O, what authority and show of truth
Can cunning sin cover itself withal!
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.
529
    I never tempted her with word too large,
But, as a brother to his sister, show’d
Bashful sincerity and comely love.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.
530
    I have mark’d
A thousand blushing apparitions
To start into her face, a thousand innocent shames
In angel whiteness beat away those blushes.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iv. Sc. 1.
 

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