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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 51
 
 
William Shakespeare. (1564–1616) (continued)
 
503
    Speak low if you speak love.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.
504
    Friendship is constant in all other things
Save in the office and affairs of love:
Therefore all hearts in love use their own tongues;
Let every eye negotiate for itself
And trust no agent.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.
505
    Silence is the perfectest herald of joy: I were but little happy, if I could say how much.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 1.
506
    Lie ten nights awake, carving the fashion of a new doublet. He was wont to speak plain and to the purpose.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.
507
    Sigh no more, ladies, sigh no more,
  Men were deceivers ever,—
One foot in sea and one on shore,
  To one thing constant never.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.
508
    Sits the wind in that corner?
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.
509
    Shall quips and sentences and these paper bullets of the brain awe a man from the career of his humour? No, the world must be peopled. When I said I would die a bachelor, I did not think I should live till I were married.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act ii. Sc. 3.
510
    Some Cupid kills with arrows, some with traps.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 1.
511
    From the crown of his head to the sole of his foot, 1 he is all mirth.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 2.
512
    Every one can master a grief but he that has it.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 2.
513
    Are you good men and true?
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
514
    To be a well-favoured man is the gift of fortune; but to write and read comes by nature.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
515
    The most senseless and fit man.
          Much Ado about Nothing. Act iii. Sc. 3.
 
Note 1.
From the crown of his head to the sole of the foot.—Pliny the Elder: Natural History, book vii. chap. xvii. Beaumont and Fletcher: The Honest Man’s Fortune, act ii. sc. 2. Thomas Middleton: A Mad World, etc. [back]
 

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