Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 408
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 408
 
 
Edmund Burke. (1729–1797) (continued)
 
4399
    Illustrious predecessor. 1
          Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent. Vol. i. p. 456.
4400
    In such a strait the wisest may well be perplexed and the boldest staggered.
          Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent. Vol. i. p. 516.
4401
    When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one, an unpitied sacrifice in a contemptible struggle.
          Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent. Vol. i. p. 526.
4402
    Of this stamp is the cant of, Not men, but measures. 2
          Thoughts on the Cause of the Present Discontent. Vol. i. p. 531.
4403
    The concessions of the weak are the concessions of fear.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 108.
4404
    There is America, which at this day serves for little more than to amuse you with stories of savage men and uncouth manners, yet shall, before you taste of death, show itself equal to the whole of that commerce which now attracts the envy of the world.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 115.
4405
    Fiction lags after truth, invention is unfruitful, and imagination cold and barren.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 116.
4406
    A people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 117.
4407
    A wise and salutary neglect.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 117.
4408
    My vigour relents,—I pardon something to the spirit of liberty.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 118.
4409
    The religion most prevalent in our northern colonies is a refinement on the principles of resistance: it is the dissidence of dissent, and the protestantism of the Protestant religion.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 123.
4410
    I do not know the method of drawing up an indictment against a whole people.
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 136.
4411
    The march of the human mind is slow. 3
          Speech on the Conciliation of America. Vol. ii. p. 149.
 
Note 1.
See Fielding, Quotation 19. [back]
Note 2.
See Goldsmith, Quotation 78. [back]
Note 3.
The march of intellect.—Robert Southey: Progress and Prospects of Society, vol. ii. p. 360. [back]
 

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