Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 375
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 375
 
 
Samuel Johnson. (1709–1784) (continued)
 
4086
    You see they ’d have fitted him to a T.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 1 Vol. viii. Chap. v. 1784.
4087
    I have found you an argument; I am not obliged to find you an understanding.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 2 Vol. viii. Chap. v. 1784.
4088
    Who drives fat oxen should himself be fat. 3
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 4 Vol. viii. Chap. v. 1784.
4089
    Blown about with every wind of criticism. 5
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 6 Vol. viii. Chap. x. 1784.
4090
    If the man who turnips cries
Cry not when his father dies,
’T is a proof that he had rather
Have a turnip than his father.
          Johnsoniana. Piozzi, 30.
4091
    He was a very good hater.
          Johnsoniana. Piozzi, 39.
4092
    The law is the last result of human wisdom acting upon human experience for the benefit of the public.
          Johnsoniana. Piozzi, 58.
4093
    The use of travelling is to regulate imagination by reality, and instead of thinking how things may be, to see them as they are.
          Johnsoniana. Piozzi, 154.
4094
    Dictionaries are like watches; the worst is better than none, and the best cannot be expected to go quite true.
          Johnsoniana. Piozzi, 178.
4095
    Books that you may carry to the fire and hold readily in your hand, are the most useful after all.
          Johnsoniana. Hawkins. 197.
4096
    Round numbers are always false.
          Johnsoniana. Hawkins. 235.
4097
    As with my hat 7 upon my head
  I walk’d along the Strand,
I there did meet another man
  With his hat in his hand. 8
          Johnsoniana. George Steevens. 310.
4098
    Abstinence is as easy to me as temperance would be difficult.
          Johnsoniana. Hannah More. 467.
4099
    The limbs will quiver and move after the soul is gone.
          Johnsoniana. Northcote. 487.
 
Note 1.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 2.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 3.
A parody on “Who rules o’er freemen should himself be free,” from Brooke’s “Gustavus Vasa,” first edition. [back]
Note 4.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 5.
Carried about with every wind of doctrine.—Ephesians iv. 14. [back]
Note 6.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 7.
Elsewhere found, “I put my hat.” [back]
Note 8.
A parody on Percy’s “Hermit of Warkworth.” [back]
 

CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors