Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 374
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 374
 
 
Samuel Johnson. (1709–1784) (continued)
 
There was another fine passage too which he struck out: “When I was a young man, being anxious to distinguish myself, I was perpetually starting new propositions. But I soon gave this over; for I found that generally what was new was false.”
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 1 Vol. vii. Chap. viii. 1779.
4077
    Claret is the liquor for boys, port for men; but he who aspires to be a hero must drink brandy.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 2 Vol. vii. Chap. viii. 1779.
4078
    A Frenchman must be always talking, whether he knows anything of the matter or not; an Englishman is content to say nothing when he has nothing to say.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 3 Vol. vii. Chap. x.
4079
    Of Dr. Goldsmith he said, “No man was more foolish when he had not a pen in his hand, or more wise when he had.”
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 4 Vol. vii. Chap. x.
4080
    The applause of a single human being is of great consequence.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 5 Vol. vii. Chap. x.
4081
    The potentiality of growing rich beyond the dreams of avarice. 6
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 7 Vol. viii. Chap. ii.
4082
    Classical quotation is the parole of literary men all over the world.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 8 Vol. viii. Chap. iii. 1781.
4083
    My friend was of opinion that when a man of rank appeared in that character [as an author], he deserved to have his merits handsomely allowed. 9
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 10 Vol. viii. Chap. iii. 1781.
4084
    I never have sought the world; the world was not to seek me. 11
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 12 Vol. viii. Chap. v. 1783.
4085
    He is not only dull himself, but the cause of dullness in others. 13
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 14 Vol. viii. Chap. v. 1784.
 
Note 1.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 2.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 3.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 4.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 5.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 6.
I am rich beyond the dreams of avarice.—Edward Moore: The Gamester, act ii. sc. 2. 1753. [back]
Note 7.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 8.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 9.
Usually quoted as “When a nobleman writes a book, he ought to be encouraged.” [back]
Note 10.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 11.
I have not loved the world, nor the world me.—Lord Byron: Childe Harold, canto iii. stanza 113. [back]
Note 12.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 13.
See Shakespeare, King Henry IV. Part II, Quotation 3. [back]
Note 14.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
 

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