Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 373
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 373
 
 
Samuel Johnson. (1709–1784) (continued)
 
4065
    No man but a blockhead ever wrote except for money.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 1 Vol. vi. Chap. iii. 1776.
4066
    Questioning is not the mode of conversation among gentlemen.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 2 Vol. vi. Chap. iv. 1776.
4067
    A man is very apt to complain of the ingratitude of those who have risen far above him.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 3 Vol. vi. Chap. iv. 1776.
4068
    All this [wealth] excludes but one evil,—poverty.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 4 Vol. vi. Chap. ix. 1777.
4069
    Employment, sir, and hardships prevent melancholy.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 5 Vol. vi. Chap. ix. 1777.
4070
    When a man is tired of London he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 6 Vol. vi. Chap. ix. 1777.
4071
    He was so generally civil that nobody thanked him for it.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 7 Vol. vi. Chap. ix. 1777.
4072
    Goldsmith, however, was a man who whatever he wrote, did it better than any other man could do.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 8 Vol. vii. Chap. iii. 1778.
4073
    Johnson said that he could repeat a complete chapter of “The Natural History of Iceland” from the Danish of Horrebow, the whole of which was exactly thus: “There are no snakes to be met with throughout the whole island.” 9 [Chap. lxxii.]
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 10 Vol. vii. Chap. iv. 1778.
4074
    As the Spanish proverb says, “He who would bring home the wealth of the Indies must carry the wealth of the Indies with him,” so it is in travelling,—a man must carry knowledge with him if he would bring home knowledge.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 11 Vol. vii. Chap. v. 1778.
4075
    The true, strong, and sound mind is the mind that can embrace equally great things and small.
          Life of Johnson (Boswell). 12 Vol. vii. Chap. vi. 1778.
4076
    I remember a passage in Goldsmith’s “Vicar of Wakefield,” which he was afterwards fool enough to expunge: “I do not love a man who is zealous for nothing.”…
 
Note 1.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 2.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 3.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 4.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 5.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 6.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 7.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 8.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 9.
Chapter xlii. is still shorter: “There are no owls of any kind in the whole island.” [back]
Note 10.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 11.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
Note 12.
From the London edition, 10 volumes, 1835.

Dr. Johnson, it is said, when he first heard of Boswell’s intention to write a life of him, announced, with decision enough, that if he thought Boswell really meant to write his life he would prevent it by taking Boswell’s!Thomas Carlyle: Miscellanies, Jean Paul Frederic Richter. [back]
 

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