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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 330
 
 
Alexander Pope. (1688–1744) (continued)
 
3564
    Praise undeserv’d is scandal in disguise. 1
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 413.
3565
    Years following years steal something every day;
At last they steal us from ourselves away.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle ii. Book ii. Line 72.
3566
    The vulgar boil, the learned roast, an egg.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle ii. Book ii. Line 85.
3567
    Words that wise Bacon or brave Raleigh spoke.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle ii. Book ii. Line 168.
3568
    Grac’d as thou art with all the power of words,
So known, so honour’d at the House of Lords. 2
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle vi. Book i. To. Mr. Murray.
3569
    Vain was the chief’s the sage’s pride!
They had no poet, and they died.
          Odes. Book iv. Ode 9.
3570
    Nature and Nature’s laws lay hid in night:
God said, “Let Newton be!” and all was light.
          Epitaph intended for Sir Isaac Newton.
3571
    Ye Gods! annihilate but space and time,
And make two lovers happy.
          Martinus Scriblerus on the Art of Sinking in Poetry. Chap. xi.
3572
    O thou! whatever title please thine ear,
Dean, Drapier, Bickerstaff, or Gulliver!
Whether thou choose Cervantes’ serious air,
Or laugh and shake in Rabelais’ easy-chair.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 19.
3573
    Poetic Justice, with her lifted scale,
Where in nice balance truth with gold she weighs,
And solid pudding against empty praise.
          The Dunciad. Book i. Line 52.
 
Note 1.
This line is from a poem entitled “To the Celebrated Beauties of the British Court,” given in Bell’s “Fugitive Poetry,” vol. iii. p. 118.

The following epigram is from “The Grove,” London, 1721:—

When one good line did much my wonder raise,
In Br—st’s work, I stood resolved to praise,
And had, but that the modest author cries,
“Praise undeserved is scandal in disguise.”
On a certain line of Mr. Br——, Author of a Copy of Verses called the British Beauties. [back]
Note 2.
See Cibber, Quotation 21. [back]
 

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