Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 329
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 329
 
 
Alexander Pope. (1688–1744) (continued)
 
3549
    Do good by stealth, and blush to find it fame.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epilogue to the Satires. Dialogue i. Line 136.
3550
    To Berkeley every virtue under heaven.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epilogue to the Satires. Dialogue ii. Line 73.
3551
    When the brisk minor pants for twenty-one.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book i. Line 38.
3552
    He ’s armed without that ’s innocent within.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book i. Line 94.
3553
    Get place and wealth, if possible, with grace;
If not, by any means get wealth and place. 1
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book i. Line 103.
3554
    Above all Greek, above all Roman fame. 2
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 26.
3555
    Authors, like coins, grow dear as they grow old.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 35.
3556
    The mob of gentlemen who wrote with ease.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 108.
3557
    One simile that solitary shines
In the dry desert of a thousand lines.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 111.
3558
    Then marble soften’d into life grew warm,
And yielding, soft metal flow’d to human form. 3
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 147.
3559
    Who says in verse what others say in prose.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 202.
3560
    Waller was smooth; but Dryden taught to join
The varying verse, the full resounding line,
The long majestic march, and energy divine.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 267.
3561
    E’en copious Dryden wanted or forgot
The last and greatest art,—the art to blot.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 280.
3562
    Who pants for glory finds but short repose:
A breath revives him, or a breath o’erthrows. 4
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 300.
3563
    There still remains to mortify a wit
The many-headed monster of the pit. 5
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Epistle i. Book ii. Line 304.
 
Note 1.
See Ben Jonson, Quotation 4. [back]
Note 2.
See Dryden, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 3.
The canvas glow’d beyond ev’n Nature warm;
The pregnant quarry teem’d with human form.
Oliver Goldsmith: The Traveller, line 137. [back]
Note 4.
A breath can make them as a breath has made.—Oliver Goldsmith: The Deserted Village, line 54. [back]
Note 5.
See Sidney, Quotation 6. [back]
 

CONTENTS · BIBLIOGRAPHIC RECORD · AUTHOR INDEX · CONCORDANCE INDEX
  PREVIOUS NEXT  
 
Loading
Click here to shop the Bartleby Bookstore.

Shakespeare · Bible · Strunk · Anatomy · Nonfiction · Quotations · Reference · Fiction · Poetry
© 1993–2014 Bartleby.com · [Top 150] · Subjects · Titles · Authors