Reference > Quotations > John Bartlett, comp. > Familiar Quotations, 10th ed. > Page 328
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John Bartlett (1820–1905).  Familiar Quotations, 10th ed.  1919.
 
Page 328
 
 
Alexander Pope. (1688–1744) (continued)
 
3537
    Satire or sense, alas! can Sporus feel?
Who breaks a butterfly upon a wheel?
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 307.
3538
    Eternal smiles his emptiness betray,
As shallow streams run dimpling all the way.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 315.
3539
    Wit that can creep, and pride that licks the dust.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 333.
3540
    That not in fancy’s maze he wander’d long,
But stoop’d to truth, and moraliz’d his song. 1
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 340.
3541
    Me let the tender office long engage
To rock the cradle of reposing age;
With lenient arts extend a mother’s breath,
Make languor smile, and smooth the bed of death;
Explore the thought, explain the asking eye,
And keep awhile one parent from the sky.
          Epistle to Dr. Arbuthnot. Prologue to the Satires. Line 408.
3542
    Lord Fanny spins a thousand such a day.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 6.
3543
    Satire ’s my weapon, but I ’m too discreet
To run amuck, and tilt at all I meet.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 69.
3544
    But touch me, and no minister so sore;
Whoe’er offends at some unlucky time
Slides into verse, and hitches in a rhyme,
Sacred to ridicule his whole life long,
And the sad burden of some merry song.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 76.
3545
    Bare the mean heart that lurks behind a star.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 110.
3546
    There St. John mingles with my friendly bowl,
The feast of reason and the flow of soul.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire i. Book ii. Line 127.
3547
    For I, who hold sage Homer’s rule the best,
Welcome the coming, speed the going guest. 2
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire ii. Book ii. Line 159.
3548
    Give me again my hollow tree,
A crust of bread, and liberty.
          Satires, Epistles, and Odes of Horace. Satire vi. Book ii. Line 220.
 
Note 1.
See Spenser, Quotation 1. [back]
Note 2.
This line is repeated in the translation of the Odyssey, book xv. line 83, with “parting” instead of “going.” [back]
 

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